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Full text of "P & S ... : the yearbook of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University in the city of New York"

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P&S '63 

College of Physicians and Surgeons 
Columbia University 




To Dr. David Seegal, this yearbook is dedicated 
with deep and abiding appreciation. 

Generations of physicians are grateful for 
your guidance and teaching. You have given us a 
new conception of the physician's role, as teacher 
and communicator as well as healer. You have 
provided new implements for the doctor's bag: the 
Golden Rule, the open mind, the ability to say "I 
don't know." Your enthusiasm is infectious, your 
standards for the practice of medicine are impec- 
cable. Your optimism and puckish wit have in- 
spired us. If we fail to live up to your precepts, 
the fault will lie not in our stars but in ourselves. 



LESS MAY BE MORE 



On walking by the Dean's office and 
hearing the first whirring of the IBM ma- 
chine being programmed to determine 
one's superannuation date, a number of 
past experiences take on a special clarity. 
It is tempting to comment on these ex- 
periences although one questions whether 
they will be of interest to others and 
whether the passage of time will permit ac- 
curate recollection. But relief comes to 
the oldster as he realizes that a compensa- 
tion of advanced age is the ability to re- 
member sharply the distant past although 
assistance is required to remember where 
his stethoscope has been left an hour earl- 
ier. The aging physician will, therefore, ac- 
cept the challenge of retrospection: He 
will even go further and since the nature of 
his calling encourages a degree of boldness 
he will not hesitate to grasp the horns of 
all the bulls in sight and teeter between the 
two epigrams of Henry Brooks Adams: 
"A teacher affects eternity; he can 
never tell where his influence stops." 
"Nothing is more tiresome than a 
superannuated pedagogue." 
Thinking back to the teaching of my 
preceptors in medicine, I recollect many 
pithy gems of advice which seem as valid 
today as when I first heard them years ago. 
Outstanding among the remembrances at 
this writing were those key utterances of 
my teachers which led me to change direc- 
tion, pace, or stride in the endless intel- 
lectual relay race, medical learning. The 
most meaningful and lasting educational 
favors had two components: They were 



By David Seegal 

brief and startlingly pertinent, thus an- 
ticipating Mies van der Rohe's maxim 
"Less is More," and they often involved 
me emotionally. 

I well remember an instance when, as 
an interne, I had spent the night caring for 
a patient in diabetic coma and appeared on 
morning rounds without having prepared 
an adequate report on another patient 
under discussion. Unshaven and feeling 
very noble indeed for my ministrations to 
the diabetic girl, I apologized to the at- 
tending physician in tones of martyrdom 
for not being prepared to present an ad- 
equate "work-up" on the second patient. 
I was alternately crushed and frozen when 
this doctor looked me straight in the eye, 
pointed to the bed and said: "This patient 
is not interested in your diabetic." How 
right he was! I had not yet learned how to 
apportion my hospital responsibilities. That 
single sentence so electrified my clinical 
reflexes that when on future occasions I 
was about to repeat my miscalculations of 
time devoted to the management of multiple 
patients, the specter of that scene at the 
bedside would be recreated and haunt me. 

During another experience I learned a 
lesson in a minute or two which countless 
other teaching hours had failed to provide. 
Stopping outside a room occupied by a 
hopelessly ill patient, the house staff mem- 
ber advised the attending physician that 
little would be gained by the visit; there 
was nothing to offer the patient. The at- 
tending physician demurred and said that 
he would certainly see the patient, stating: 




Above: Dr. Seegal addressing a P and S Club conference. 



"An effort should be made to assist each 
patient to feel somewhat the better for the 
visit, irrespective of the patient's status." 
That sentence has never left me and I have 
been ever grateful for that experience 
which has assisted me from shirking a duty 
and service which should be in the marrow 
of every physician. 

A recent exclamation by an eminent 
Greek scholar: "Just think, my finger 
prints are different from everyone else's 
in the world," led me to a keener apprecia- 
tion of the specificity of each individual 
and produced a vivid recollection of a 
dramatic episode in my student days. When 
the burden of disease accentuates the 
uniqueness of each human being, the 
physician's radar apparatus receives a 
design unlike any he has seen before: his 
failure to respond appropriately makes him 
less than the "good doctor." This pattern 
of conduct took on special meaning during 



a rounds with one of my revered teachers, 
who was in the last stages of a malignancy. 
A house officer tried to conserve the at- 
tending physician's strength by suggesting 
that he might pass by the next patient, who 
had a "typical" right lower lobe pneumoc- 
occal pneumonia. Our preceptor, however, 
stopped short at the bedside and said: 
"Of course, I shall examine the patient and 
listen to his chest; although I have ausculted 
thousands of lungs I have never heard two 
which sounded alike." Needless to say, we 
students were shaken by this magnificent 
show of courage and discipline. Our teach- 
er's example was not only an inspiration 
but served to make us appreciate the wide 
spectrum of clinical signs which can be 
produced by a single pathologic process. 
This perceptive bedside teacher's concern 
for the patient stimulated the latent 
clinicianship of the students. 

In caring for the elderly sick one's 
youthful diagnostic and therapeutic en- 
thusiasm sometimes leads to the use of 
inadvisable or questionable heroic meas- 

(Continued on page 8) 




Above: Dr. Beatrice Seegal. Dr. David and lion cub ai the Rome 
Zoo. 



Less May Be More 



(Continued from page 7) 

ures. This activity evoked the following 
response from one of my teachers: "The 
principle of minimal interference is para- 
mount in the management of the elderly 
patient." It became clear to me that the 
older an individual, the less his way of 
life should be disturbed. Interference or 
destruction of an established way of 
living may result in confusion or tragedy. 
The young, amorphous personality, usually 
can be vigorously molded without danger. 
In contrast, the older, more rigid person- 
ality is like a crystal, easily shattered by 
ill-considered impacts. 

One of my teachers, who never seemed 
hurried yet accomplished much, helped 
me to learn how to be reasonably effective 
in another aspect of the physician's duties. 
Pointing to his desk he said: "As the day's 
problems accumulate, I have three piles of 
work in front of me: first you tackle the one 
about which you can make immediate 
decisions, get it done and over with; then 
after appraising the second pile, contain- 
ing insufficient data, arrange for the col- 
lection of the required missing information; 
finally there is the third pile of imponder- 
ables which should be filed or thrown into 
the basket; above all, don't waste any time 
on them." This program permits increased 
energy and time for the more important 
responsibilities of the day. 

One of the most useful sentences I was 
ever to hear as a medical student occurred 
when my preceptor and kind friend re- 
marked: "The job of the physician as a 
physician and educator is not just to tell 



but to convince." He went on to impress 
us, as students, that our self-interest would 
be best served if we took the major re- 
sponsibility for active learning rather than 
depending upon passive teaching from out- 
side sources. This exhortation on the im- 
portance of the 'convincing' rather than 
the laissez-faire 'telling' approach has 
been tested and proved of value through 
my experiences. Some of the most effec- 
tive teaching maneuvers directed to us as 
students and internes were not long, often 
laborious lectures but short bursts of dis- 
tilled wisdom, offered at an appropriate 
time. 

During one morning's rounds with a very 
thoughtful physician I received two pieces 
of advice which again illustrate the po- 
tential educational effectiveness of the 
short, arresting sentence, presented at a 
critical moment. In the course of the visit 
one of the patients bluntly asked this at- 
tending physician about the chances of 
his recovery from what appeared to be a 
hopeless illness. The preceptor answered 
the various questions masterfully without 
committing himself to a dire prognosis and 
left the patient with a ray of hope. On re- 
tiring from the bedside I expressed my 
amazement and admiration at the skilfull- 
ness with which the questions had been 
fielded to the apparent satisfaction of the 
patient. My teacher responded with two 
catalytic sentences which have become 
useful blocks in my own substrate of 
management: "Before you tell the ''truth' 
to the patient, be sure you know the truth, 
and that the patient wants to hear it." 

"Patients and their families will for- 
give you for wrong diagnoses, but will 

(Continued on page 84) 



The Class of 1963 

College of 

Physicians and 

Surgeons 




M. LANIER ANDERSON 
A.B., Smith, 1959 
2116 Edgehill Road 
Louisville, Ky. 
Medicine 



WILLIAM J. ARONSON 

A.B., Harvard, 1951 

M.S., M.I.T., 1953 

8 Sumner Street 

Newton Center, Mass. 

Medicine 




ALBERT V. ASSALI 
A.B., Harvard, 1959 
99 Rue Courbe 
Port au Prince, Haiti 
Medicine 



PAUL BACHNER 

A.B., College of the City of New York 

570 Isham Street 

New York 34, N.Y. 

Pathology 




LESLIE BAER 
A.B., Wisconsin, 1959 
545 West 162 Street 
New York 34, N.Y. 
Medicine-Psychiatry 



RICHARD L. BANNER 

A.B., Amherst, 1959 

760 Rugby Road 

Brooklyn 30, N.Y. 

Medicine 



M. LeCLAIR BISSELL 
A.B., Colorado, 1950 
M.S.. Columbia, 1952 
53 Horatio Street 
New York 14, N.Y. 
Psychiatry 



NEIL R. BLACKLOW 

A.B., Harvard, 1959 

30 Shady Brook Lane 

Belmont 78. Mass. 

Medicine 




NORMA WANG BRAUN 
A.B., University of 

Pennsylvania, 1959 
1330 West Roosevelt Boulevard 
Philadelphia 40. Pa. 
Medicine 



PHILIP T. BRISKA 

A.B., Harvard, 1952 

270 Fort Washington Avenue 

New York 32, N.Y. 

Aerospace Medicine 




ARTHUR L. BROWN 
A.B., Princeton, 1959 
44 Huckleberry Lane 
Darien, Conn. 

General Practice 



ROBERT S. BROWN 

A.B., Harvard, 1959 

945 Fifth Avenue 

New York, N.Y. 

Medicine 





DAVID H. BRUCE 
A.B., Harvard, 1959 
1300 Clifford Road 
Wilmington, Del. 
Medicine 



ROBERT M. BURD 

A.B., Columbia, 1959 

2922 Williamsbridge Road 

New York, N.Y. 

Medicine 




WAYNE D. CANNON, JR. 
B.S., Yale, 1959 
5966 Graciosa Drive 
Hollywood, Cal. 
Surgery 



CLYDE W. CHUN 

A.B., Harvard, 1959 

32 Cedar Street 

Marblehead, Mass. 

Medicine 




W. HALLOWELL CHURCHILL 
A.B., Harvard, 1959 
35 Lakeview Avenue 
Cambridge, Mass. 
Medicine 



ROGER DAVID COHEN 

A.B., Harvard, 1959 

3 Montvale Road 

Newton Center, Mass. 

Surgery 



12 



ROBERT DANTE COLI 
B.S., Tufts, 1959 
191 Algonquin Drive 
Warwick. R.I. 
Medicine 



TERRANCE M. DAUGHARTY 

B.S., Seattle, 1959 

2202 North 65th Street 

Seattle 3, Wash. 

Medicine 




DAVID BECK DAVIDSON 
A.B., Harvard, 1959 
203 Hartsdale Avenue 
White Plains, N.Y. 
Surgery 



SUSAN M. DEAKINS 

A.B., Smith, 1958 

210 James Boulevard 

Signal Mountain, Tenn. 

Medicine-Pediatrics 




RICHARD A. DICKEY 
A.B., Kenyon, 1959 
2806 Green Hills Lane 
Indianapolis 22, Ind. 
Neurology-Medicine 



LOUIS E. DICKINSON 

A.B., Harvard, 1959 

110 East O Street 

McCook, Nebr. 

Medicine 




13 




MICHAEL G. EHRLICH 
A.B., Dartmouth, 1959 
2 Minerva Place 
New York 71, N.Y. 

Medicine 



MURRAY EPSTEIN 

A.B., Columbia, 1959 

540 McDonald Avenue 

Brooklyn 18, N.Y. 

Medicine 




STEPHEN A. FEIG 
A.B., Princeton, 1959 
711 West 171st Street 
New York 32, N.Y. 
Medicine 



MARTIN D. FELDMAN 

A.B., Yale, 1959 

RFD #2 Mahopac Woods 

Mahopac, N.Y. 

Neurology-Psychiatry 




DUDLEY A. FERRARI 
A.B., Columbia, 1959 
26 William Street 
Shelburne Falls, Mass. 
Surgery 



EDWIN G. FISCHER 

A.B., Harvard, 1959 

Driftway Lane 

Darien, Conn. 

Surgery 



SUSAN M. FISHER 
B.S.. Chicago, 1959 
6157 North Sheridan 
Chicago. 111. 
Psychiatry 



ANNE VAN N. GAMBLE 

A.B., Mount Holyoke, 1956 

4730 Fieldston Road 

New York. N.Y. 

Pediatrics 




MARTIN P. GELLER 
A.B., Columbia, 1959 
140 Ocean Parkway 
Brooklyn 18, N.Y. 
Psychiatry 



SANDRA E. GRANT 

A.B., Bryn Maur, 1958 

12 Chestnut Street 

Liberty, N.Y. 

Psychiatry 




CARL M. HAKANSON 
A.B., Hamilton, 1959 
199A Howard Drive 
Bergenfield, N.J. 
Surgery 



GEORGE S. HARELL 

A.B., Oberlin, 1959 

27 West 96th Street 

New York 25, N.Y. 

Medicine 




15 








ROBERT H. HEISSENBUTTEL 




^ 


A.B., Thiel, 1959 






14 Ridgeway Avenue 






Mercer, Pa. 






Medicine 


<w*ff 


V* 




hS 


r> 


EUGENE R. HOFF 

A.B., Washington University 

of St. Louis, 1960 




*"";■ . 


M.S., Yale, 1961 






3449a Klocke Street 




| 


St. Louis, Mo. 

Surgery 




JOEL S. HOFFMAN 
A.B., Harvard, 1959 
76 Trenton Avenue 
Long Beach, N.Y. 
Medicine 



CLIFTON HOWARD 

B.S., Harvard, 1943 

M.A., Harvard, 1947 

3636 Greystone Avenue 

Riverdale, N.Y. 

Psychiatry 




STUART S. HOWARDS 

A.B., Yale, 1959 

4635 North Wildwood Avenue 

Whitefish Bay, Wise. 

Surgery 



DENNIS P. HOWIE 

A.B., Hamilton, 1959 

93 80th Street 

Brooklyn 9, N.Y. 

Surgery 



16 



LAWRENCE G. 
A.B.. Yale, 1959 
1 Ridge Acres 
Darien. Conn. 
Medicine 



Hl'NSICKER 



GEORGE W. JORDAN 

B.S., Denver, 1959 

2351 East Iowa 

Denver 10, Col. 

Medicine 




MARK E. KAHN 
A.B., Columbia, 1959 
338 New York Avenue 
Brooklyn 13. N.Y. 
Medicine 



LLOYD P. KAMINS 

B.S., California Institute 

of Technology, 1959 

2215 East Glendale 

Milwaukee. Wise. 

Psychiatry 





*A< 



DAVID C. KEM 
A.B., Earlham, 1959 
Henley Road 
South Richmond, Ind. 
Medicine 



LAWRENCE KRAKOFF 

A.B., Yale, 1959 

2564 Sherwood Road 

Columbus, Ohio 

Medicine 





WARREN J. KRICK 

A.B., George Washington, 1959 

3071 Ardway Street 

Washington 8, D.C. 

Medicine 



PHILIP R. LARSEN 

A.B., Princeton, 1959 

1211 Edwards Road 

Cincinnati 8, Ohio 

Medicine 




CONRAD LATTES 
A.B., Suiarthmore, 1958 
597 Rutland Avenue 
Teaneck, N.J. 
Surgery 



ALBERT C. LESNESKI 

A.B., Princeton, 1958 

2215 Central Road 

Fort Lee> N.J. 

Obstetrics-Gynecology 




MYRON LEWIS 
A.B., Dartmouth, 1959 
1527 Linden Avenue 
Memphis, Tenn. 
Medicine 



MAYER R. LIGHTDALE 

A.B., Princeton, 1957 

272 Armstrong Avenue 

Jersey City, N.J. 

Medicine 



JACOB D. 


LINin 


4.B., Yale, 


1959 


1034 West 


Upsal Street 


Philadelphia. Pa. 


Medicine 






ELISABETH McSHERRY 




A.B., Radcliffe, 1960 




Box 2 




West Falmouth, Mass. 




Neurology 




GERALD L. MACKLER 
A.B., Harvard, 1959 
99 Mohawk Drive 
West Hartford, Conn. 
Medicine 




-«&&'■ V 




AVRON J. MALETZKY 

A.B., Princeton, 1959 

1189 Ardsley Road 

Schenectady, N.Y. 
Medicine-Pediatrics 



JtkJk* 



ALAN D. MANZLER 
A.B., Princeton, 1959 
6340 Main Road 
Cincinnati 43, Ohio 
Medicine 



GEORGE S. MAUERMAN 

A.B., Vanderbilt, 1959 

2021 Eleventh Street 

Monroe, Wise. 

Surgery 





W. JOST MICHELSEN 
A.B. Harvard, 1959 
253 Marlboro St. 
Boston, Mass. 
Neuro-Surgery 



DANIEL D. MORGAN 

A.B. Yale, 1959 

10 Livingston St. 

New Haven, Conn. • 

Surgery 




PAUL W. MOSHER 
A.B. Harvard, 1958 
22 Maxwood St. 
Albany, N.Y. 
Psychiatry 



PETER F. MUEHLBAUER 

A.B. Columbia, 1959 

9 Prospect Park West 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Medicine 




HARVARD YALE MUHM 
B.A. Yale, 1959 
13 Prairie Haute 
St. Charles, Mo. 
Surgery 



JOHN T. MURPHY 

Princeton 

29 Chatham Road 

Chappaqua, N.Y. 

Medicine 



20 



DANIEL M. MUSHER 
A.B. Harvard. 1959 
59 W. 71 St. 
N.Y., N.Y. 

Medicine 



PETER TODD NAIMAN 

A.B. Williams, 1959 

470 Ocean Ave. 

Brooklyn 26. N.Y. 

Surgery 




EVA JULIA NEER 
A.B. Barnard, 1959 
c/o Robert Neer 

National Institutes of Health 

Washington. D.C. 
Seurology 



BRUCE D. NELSON 

BA. Boudoin, 1959 

223 Harvard St. 

Portland. Maine 

Surgery 




CARMEN ORTIZ NEU 
A.B. Wellesley, 1959 
c/o Harold Neu 

National Institutes of Health 

Washington. D.C. 
Pediatrics 



WILLIAM NEVEL 

A.B. Columbia, 1959 

128 Gladstone Ave. 

Walden, N.Y. 

Surgery 





MARC E. NEWBERG 
A.B. Williams, 1959 
178-12 Kildare Road 
Jamaica 32, N.Y. 
Medicine 



JOHN NOBLE III 

A.B. Harvard, 1959 

c/o Tapline Box 1348 

Beirut, Lebanon 

Medicine 




4^'fc 




RICHARD C. ORAHOOD 
A.B. Ohio Wesleyan, 1958 
235 W. 4th St. 
Marysville, Ohio 
Surgery 



ROBERT B. PAGE 

A.B. Amherst, 1959 

120 Haven Ave. 

N.Y. 32, N.Y. 
Surgery 




GEORGE PARIS 
B.S. Carnegie Tech 
313 Jackson Ave. 
Ridgeway, Penn. 
Medicine 



JAMES D. PARKER 

A.B. Cornell, 1959 

17 Cambridge Rd. 

Glen Ridge, N.J. 

Medicine 



22 



THOMAS W. PARKS 
A.B. Cornell, 1956 
47 E. 63rd St. 
N.Y. 21, N.Y. 
Medicine 



RICHARD D. PERLMAN 

BA. Princeton, 1959 

225 Eastern Parkway 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Orthopedic Surgery 




DAVID E. PLEASURE 
A.B. Yale, 1959 
Middletown Hospital 
Middletown, N.Y. 
Medicine 



JEANETTE RODNAN PLEASURE 

A.B. Barnard, 1959 

Middletown Hospital 

Middletown, N.Y. 

Medicine 




MARK H. POHLMAN 
BA. Princeton, 1959 
109 S. Stanwood Rd. 
Columbus 9, Ohio 
Surgery 



GERALDINE POPPA 

A.B. Vassar, 1959 

112 Kent St. 

Brooklyn 22, N.Y. 

Medicine 





MICHAEL L. RAPPAPORT 
A.B. Harvard, 1958 
1403 Waverly Rd. 
Highland Park, 111. 
Medicine 



DAVID N. REIFSNYDER 

A.B. Columbia, 1957 

35 Cumming St. 

N.Y. 34, N.Y. 

Medicine 




JOEL M. REIN 
A.B. Columbia, 1959 
5621 Netherland Ave. 

N.Y. 71, N.Y. 
Surgery 



JAMES C. REYNOLDS 

A.B. Harvard, 1959 

710 Coral Lane 

Alexandria, Va. 

Surgery 




STEPHEN M. RITTENBERG 
A.B. Columbia, 1957 
192 N. Woodland St. 
Englewood, N.J. 
Psychiatry 



MAJ-BRITT T. 



ROSENBAUM 

University of Helsinki 

838 Riverside Drive 

N.Y. 32, N.Y. 

Pediatrics 



24 



MARTIN G. ROSENBLATT 
A.B. Princeton, 1958 
168 Christopher St. 
Montc-lair. N.J. 
Medicine 



RICHARD A. RUDDERS 

A.B. Princeton, 1959 

1489 E. 24th St. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Medic Ute 




RICHARD A. RYDER 
B.S. Rochester, 1956 
Booneville. N.Y. 
Medicine 



FREDERICK L. SACHS 

A.B. Princeton, 1959 

1122 Ocean Ave. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Medicine 





ROBERT M. SADE 
BA. Wesleyan, 1959 
815 Chestnut St. 
Newton, Mass. 
Surgery 



JOEL W. SAKS 

B.A. Wesleyan, 1959 

8 Hartford Terrace 

Springfield, Mass. 

Surgery 




25 




ROBERT A. SCHAEFER 
BA. Yale, 1959 
36 Seneca St. 
Dobbs Ferry, N.Y. 
Medicine 



ALAN N. SCHECHTER 

A.B. Cornell, 1959 

1800 Avenue L 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Medicine 




DAVID L. SCHEINER 
A.B. Princeton, 1959 
2 Circle Road 
Margate, N.J. 
Medicine 



ALFRED L. SCHERZER 

MA. Yale, 1957 

626 W. 165th St. 

N.Y. 32, N.Y. 

Pediatrics 




WILLIAM J. SCHNEIDER 
B.S. Tufts, 1959 
20 Fletcher Ave. 
Mt. Vernon, N.Y. 
Medicine 



STEPHEN SCHONBERG 

A.B. Princeton, 1959 

415 Bedell Terrace 

West Hempstead, N.Y. 

Surgery 



DAVID T. SCHWARTZ 
A.B. Harvard, 1959 
2563 Edgerton Rd. 
Cleveland, Ohio 
Surgery 



BARBARA JO SERBER 

Ph.D. Columbia, 1959 

334 W. 86th St. 

N.Y., N.Y. 

Medicine 




JONATHAN L. SERXNER 
A.B. Columbia, 1959 
2314 Avenue I 
Brooklyn 10, New York 
Psychiatry 



JEROME L. SHUPACK 

A.B. Columbia, 1959 

216 E. 96th St. 

Brooklyn 12, New York 

Medicine 




LAWRENCE R. SILVER 
A.B. Yale, 1959 
696 Broadway 
Cedarhurst, N.Y. 
Surgery 



JOHN S. SIMMONDS 

A.B. Yale, 1959 

3611 Abingdon St. 

Arlington, Va. 

Medicine 




27 




CHARLES M. SMITH 
A.B. Princeton, 1959 
614 Oneida Rd. 
Chillicothe, Ohio 
Surgery 



BERNARD M. SNYDER 

A.B. Franklin and Marshall, 1959 

2409 N. 5th. St. 

Harrisburg, Pa. 

Psychiatry 



M 




^ 1 


% 


■ 






LEONARD I. STEINFELD 
A.B. Princeton, 1959 
2013 Yates Ave. 
N.Y. 61, N.Y. 
Obstetrics-Gynecology 



CHARLES R. STEINMAN 

A.B. Princeton, 1959 

2807 Kings Highway 

Brooklyn 29, N.Y. 

Medicine 




MARC J. TAYLOR 
A.B. Amherst, 1959 
55 Pennsylvania Ave. 
Mount Vernon, N.Y. 
Medicine 



FREDERICK W. TILEY 

A.B. Princeton, 1959 

232 S. Third St. 

Lehighton, Pa. 

Orthopedic Surgery 



ELI R. WAYNE 
A.B. University of 

Pennsylvania, 1959 
27 Crimson St. 
Forti Fort, Pa. 
Surgery 



BABETTE B. WEKSLER 

A.B. Swarthmore, 1958 

835 Red Rd. 

Teaneck, N.J. 

Medicine 




JERRY A. WIDER 
A.B. Princeton, 1959 
39 Bay Shore Ave. 
Bay Shore, N.Y. 

Surgery 



THOMAS A. WILLIAMS 

A.B. Harvard, 1958 

804 Blaine Blvd. 

Racine, Wisconsin 

Surgery 




HOWARD L. WOLFINGER 
B.S. Haverford, 1959 
261 Apple Drive 
Greencastle, Pa. 
Medicine 



DEAN S. WOOD 

A.B. Harvard, 1959 

905 Main St. 

Watsonville, California 

Psychiatry 




29 




JULIAN C. ZENER 
A.B. Harvard, 1959 
2727 Sparger Rd. 
Durham, N.C. 
Medicine 



EUGENE M. ZWEIBACK 
A.B. Princeton, 1959 
8715 William St. 
Omaha, Nebraska 

Surgery 




Class Officers 




President George Mauerman 

Vice President John Noble 

Secretary Jeanette Pleasure 

Treasurer Alfred Scherzer 




WHAT'S THIS, WHAT'S THIS, WHAT'S THIS: A scene 
iniscent of the pleasant hours spent in anatomy lab — consj 
ously absent is an instructor. L to r: Jerry Shupack, Peter Mi 
bauer, Joel Rein. 



30 



Alpha Omega Alpha 




Seated L. to r: Parker, Heissenbuttel, Steinman, kahn, Rosenbaum. Standing L to r: Howards, Hun- 
sicker, Simmonds, Schechter, Rappaport. Taylor, Brown, Ehrlich. Missing: Krakoff. Pleasure, Baer, 
Churchill, Newberg, Poppa, Weksler. 



Third Year 



Fourth Year 



Robert Heissenbutter 
Mark Kahn 
Lawrence Krakoff 
James Parker 
David Pleasure 
Michael Rappaport 
Charles Steinman 



Leslie Baer 

Robert Brown 

W. HaUowell Churchill 

Michael Ehrlich 

Stuart Howards 

Lawrence Hunsicker 

Marc Newberg 



Geraldine Poppa 
Maj-Britt Rosenbaum 
Alan Schechter 
John Simmonds 
Marc Taylor 
Babette Weksler 



31 




ifg^j 







OUR HEARTS WERE YOUNG AND GAY-t/pper left: Marty Feldman, scientist. Upper right: Bob Coli and Bernie Snyder on Staten 
Island Ferry. Center: George Jordan at work. Bottom left: Larry Krakoff in a rare pose. Bottom right: Larry Silver in a contemplative mo- 
ment. 



32 





Class Chronicle 





33 



Days of Wine and Roses 



"A P and S class resembles a symphony 
orchestra in which diverse elements blend 
together to achieve a harmonious effect." 
With these words, Dr. Aura E. Severing- 
haus greeted the Class of 1963 of the Col- 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons on a humid 
September evening in 1959. Over the next 
four years we were to demonstrate unity 
and diversity as we pursued the thorny 
path which soon will end with the recital 
of the Hippocratic Oath and the singing of 
"Stand Columbia." The history of a class 
is a tenuous and fragile thing into which is 
interwoven one-hundred and twenty in- 
dividual stories converging to form those 
palpable moods or events which may be 
designated, in retrospect, "landmarks." 
Here are some of those landmarks. 

The first year was hectic and trying. 
We expected to be handed stethoscopes, 
otoscopes and patients. Instead we heard 
the following: "Heterolactic bacteria 
catalyze analogous reactions between 
acetaldehyde and pyruvate — carbamino — 
CO is also liberated in conversion of 
hemoglobin to oxyhemoglobin — when the 
sarcoplasm is distributed irregularly, the 
fibrils appear in groups known as Gohn- 
heim's fields — the nucleus posteromar- 
ginalis (nucleus magnocellularis pericorn- 
ualis) — appreciate the gluteus maximus — 
Z-Hat is significant to P of .05 if we apply 
the chi square." We were bombarded with 
facts; bludgeoned by facts; titillated, 
amused, angered, wrought emotionless 
by facts. Facts came in various sizes, 
shapes and accents. We walked through a 
labyrinth dotted with figures who con- 




SPIRIT OF '63 -Myron Lewis confronts the facts. 

fused, confounded or illuminated. In this 
maze certain figures stand out in bas- 
relief. 

Dr. Rittenberg's mustache, cigar and 
showmanship introduced a touch of 
Groucho into his scholarship. He used a 
deck of cards, shattered eggs and snatches 
of Alice in Wonderland to explain the con- 
cept of entropy. An iconoclastic German 
biochemist, Erwin Chargaff, in a series of 
spell-binding lectures introduced us to 
the new frontier of DNA, goo-a-nene, 
zy-to-zene and calf ty-moose. Dr. Copen- 
haver taught us what a slide looked like 
by drawing one on the blackboard — "if 
you have any difficulty understanding this," 
he added, "it is well-covered in my book." 
Dr. Pappas squawked, harangued and 
howled his way through the world of the 
electrawn microscope and the GAWLGIE 
BAWDIES — we soon learned that the 
latter referred to components of a cell 
rather than a house. 



34 



Anatomy was a world unto itself. On 
the first day of the course. Dr. Elftman as- 
sured us, "Cunningham's text is complete, 
I have little to add — my lectures will be 
mere comments," (and they were). Dr. 
Elftman's athetoid movements were a 
source of wonder and delight — they clearly 
demonstrated "lines of action." Dr. Mel- 
vin Moss talked about Eskimos and Indians 
— he even told us about the saphenous 
vein one day, an obvious concession to the 
fact that we were taking a course in an- 
atomy. Drs. Noback and Carpenter led 
the march from coccyx to cortex with 
stops and excursions along the way. In 
physiology we learned the "principles of 
animal torture" from Dr. Root. Dr. Chien 
assisted us in mastery of the mechanics 
of salivation. Dr. Cizek's lengthy disserta- 
tion on renal physiology continued for 
nine innings. Dr. Gregersen looked on, in- 
voking Claude Bernard and Walter .Cannon. 

The first year culminated in the class 
show, an epic entitled "Murder of an 
Anatomy," written by Messrs. Schwartz, 
Geller and Muehlbauer (with incidental 





KEEP YOUR WHITE ENVELOPES: Paul Bachner. John Mur- 
phy and friend. 



THE BRIDGE GAME -From left: Connie Lattes, Steve Feig, 
Roger Cohen, Pete Muehlbauer, Bob Brown. 

lyrics by Musher. The world thrilled to the 
star-crossed love between freshman 
medical student Claude Bevans (Jack 
Lindy) and the daughter of the head of 
biochemistry, Desdemona Wittenberg 
(Carmen Ortiz). From rousing opening 
number ("Here comes Jerry Wider . . .") 
to stunning denovement (the discovery of 
(Bevan's Goo) the show captured its aud- 
ience and welded the class into a creative 
unit. 

The second year may be remembered 
as the year the class turned from its books 
to other pursuits: marriage and politics. 
While statistics are unavailable, 1960-61 
was the peak year for class matrimony. 
Acrimonious political debate also threat- 
ened to burst class unity asunder; but we 
held together in the face of the common 
enemy — pathology, microbiology, phar- 
macology. 

A familiar scene is remembered: It is 
Friday afternoon in the seventh floor 
amphitheater. Dr. Elvin Kabat, a gleam in 
his eye, stands at the lectern clutching a 
class list. He is about to call upon one of 
the quivering students when a voice inter- 



35 






AT WORK AND PLAY-Above left: 
Julian Zener and Carl Hakanson. Above 
center: Chris Reynolds and friend. Above 
right: Bob Coli and Dr. Cizek. Below 
left: Pete Naiman, Otto and Dick Perl- 
man. Below right: Roger Cohen. 





rupts him: "suffice it to say, to wit, mark 
you Dr. Kabat, if I could just clarify a 
point in your lecture." A collective sigh of 
relief is breathed as Dr. Harry Rose 
launches into a lengthy elegant dissertation. 
The afternoon ends with Dr. Sam Beiser 
who will repeat for the sixth time, a lecture 
on viral genetics. 

During the second year we witnessed 
the passing of a pathology department, and 
we gratefully filed away the pencil sharp- 
eners. Dr. McKay was clearly a new man 
— "C is an excellent grade at P and S," 
he told us, and he proved his point. Phar- 
macology brought us a new lexicon of 
terms, formulae and physiology — we might 
still prescribe the home remedies, but we 
would understand them. Dr. Wang, in his 
inscrutable manner, made the comment 



of the year. When a student was unable to 
discuss sacral parasympathetic function, 
Dr. Wang queried "wassa matter, you 
married boy?" 

By March a harried, haggard Class 
of '63 had survived the triple threat and 
was ready to enter the clinical phase of 
medical education. Dr. Yale Kneeland 
personified clinicianship. Wise, witty, 
sophisticated, he spoke in cultivated mock- 
ing tones. He taught us to percuss "grace- 
fully" and to use the "instrument of precis- 
ion." He counselled us upon bearing and 
manner, "be not gay as a minstrel; above 
all, a physican is conservative." We 
pounded, percussed and ausculted each 
other in the sweatshop and then descended 
upon the hospitals of New York like vul- 
tures to practice our new-found art. The 



36 




WORDS AND MUSIC- L. to r: Peter 
Muehlbauer, Lou Dickinson, Martin 
Geller in the act of creation. 




LOUDER PLEASE -L. to r: Daniel 
Musher, Robert Burd, Dave Bruce, 
Chuck Smith. 




IT TAKES A WHITE COAT TO LOOK 
MEDICAL — L. to r: Dave Davidson, 
Bill Arend, Gary Fisher, Jack Lindy. 




APPRECIATE THE GLUTEUS MAXI- 
MUS-t. to r: John Noble, Robert Burd, 
Mark Kahn, Steve Feig. 




HE'S ON HIS WAY-L. to r: Dan 
Musher, Larry Krakoff, Carmen Neu, 
Jack Lindy, John Noble, Chuck Smith, 
Steve Feig. 



signs of our transformation into physicians 
were subtle. Chino pants were replaced by 
conventional slacks and even Krick donned 
a tie (until the Ben Casey shirt arrived on 
the scene). The last remnant of the pre- 
clinical years was Dr. Brown's course in 
parasitology. We were steeped in life cycles 
and stools. Most memorable was the story 
of how Dr. Brown and Bennie Oosterbaum 
fished through the portal of ah outhouse 
over a lake in Michigan, thereby becoming 
unwitting participants in parasitic life 
cycles. 

Suddenly third year was upon us and we 
were full-fledged members of the medical 
community (or so we thought). Clinical 




PAUSE THAT REFRESHES: L. to r: 
Sue Deakins, Steve Feig, Lanier Ander- 
son. Lou Dickinson, Clair Bissell. 




DO YOU REMEMBER THE GOBI DESERT. AUGUSTUS?- 
L. to r: Robert Brown. Chris Reynolds, Michael Ehrlich. 



37 



Clerks are a strange breed, more clerk 
than clinician. For most, the third year 
medicine was rewarding albeit an intense 
period of hard work and learning. To the 
interne, we were useful "partners" who 
could be summoned at 3 A.M. to paste an 
E.K.G. into the chart, draw hourly blood 
heliums via femoral puncture and serve 
as cannon fodder on daily rounds. As we 
stumbled through our 32 hour day we 
gradually acquired confidence and new 
skills; mastery of the venipuncture, the IV 
and the stool guaiac. Dr. Bradley's rounds 
were a baptism by fire. The chief of med- 
icine seemed to have eyes in the back of 
his head as he would wheel around and 
fire a question at a sleepy student in the 
third row — "what are the Korotkoff 
sounds, how many milligrams of potassium 
in a glass of lime soda, what does nitro- 
glycerin taste like?" 

In pediatrics we were introduced to a 
new clinical entity — the juvenile crock. 
We floundered amidst squawling infants 
and predatory mothers; we fumbled our 




BEN CASEY AND DISCIPLE: Warren Krick in familiar pose 
speaking to Bob Coli aboard the Staten Island Ferry. 

way through presentations. "That was a 
very terrible talk," Dr. Alexander gently 
informed many of us. In our three week 
surgical stint we learned of the tyranny 
of the scrub brush, the sterile field and re- 
tractor and of the hazards of removing a 
martini glass from the rectum. We dis- 
covered that surgery was indeed a part of 





CLINICAL CLERK AT WORK: Sandy Grant doing a blood KING OF THE WARDS: Jost Michelsen and unknown admirer, 

count. 



38 



the medical profession — the truth lies in 
the patient, counselled Dr. Milton Porter. 
W e learned the elements of psychiatric 
interviewing from Dr. Israel Kesselbrenner 
("how have you been"). We took a whirl- 
wind tour of the specialties and browsed 
through a wide variety of electives. 

THE FOURTH YEAR: We had 
scaled the Empyrean heights: we had ar- 
rived: everything was coming up roses. The 
quest for internships dominated the final 
year. We were told that all Columbia stu- 
dents .got at least their second choice, ex- 
cluding flyers, of course, and we wondered 
whether all of our selections were flyers. 
Trips, interviews, examinations ("what is 
the total body zinc? would you rather 
drown in sea water or fresh water?") 
By March 1 1 the wheels of the IBM had 
ground out the answers and we were able 
to relax for the ensuing months (with the 
minor problem of National Boards still 
hovering overhead). 

The memories of this year are still 
fresh and differ for each of us: our paths 
diverged markedly as some went to Luke's, 
others to Roosevelt, Goldwater or Basset. 
Certain memories stand out. Arthur Werth- 
eim and David Seegal attempting to "bring 





THE ANATOMY LESSON -L. to r: Rolf Barih. Al Scherzer. 
Otto. Oil Cannon, unknown. Many reldman, Oeorge Jordan. 




HAVE YOU EVER HAD A PERITONSILLAR ABSCESS?: 
Dick Perlman and patient. 




THANK GOD IT'S FRIDAY: 
Schneider heads back to Bard. 



Bill 



MORE CLERK THAN CLINICIAN: Joel Rein in the act of 
creation. 



39 



out our latency" — "if you end up in the 
gutter, Fischer, the fault will be your own." 
In Group Clinic we were exposed to out- 
patient medicine and the incomparable 
team of Atchley and Melcher. (We also met 
the pleasantest PH employees — Mrs. 
Townsend and Mrs. Ray). At Bellevue, we 
saw enough pathology to sate even the most 
indomitable clinician. In pediatrics, we 
learned to mix intravenous fluids, perhaps 
the most valuable experience in the fourth 
year. Memories of the Labor Room are 
unique for each group. It is impossible to 
recapture the flavor of the 3 A.M. bridge 
game, the stat hematocrit at 4 A.M., the 
stat Frei test at 6 A.M. We have all heard 
of how Eva Neer's patient delivered on 
the X-ray table while Eva stood by wonder- 
ing whether to use her teeth in the absence 
of a cord set. 

Memories flood the mind as landmarks 
pass in review. The future is hazy but we 
face it with confidence in the strength of 
our training. We have been enriched by 
facts, concepts, new reflexes. These are 
the memories. 

Robert Burd '63 




A.fc i&\ 



j. si'. i 

SCENE OF THE CRIME: The Presbyterian Hospital as seen 
from the garden. 





HONORARY MEMBER OF THE CLASS: Jim Kildare. M.D. 





AS DR. BONHAM WOULD SAY: Dan Musher and Eva Neer. CLINITEST, SHMINITEST, THE URINE TASTED SWEET: 

Al Scherzer in the clinical lab. 



The Classes 

of 

1964 

1965 

1966 






1 1 1 ' 

f t » 








First Row: Milgram, Saland, Miller, Sah, Sinsarian. Second Roiv: Lowance, Embury, William, Pinchot, Hollander, Knapp. 
Third Row: Wolff, Seymann, Kelly, Lefkowitz, Albright, Walker, Tavernetti, Withington, Kaufman. Fourth Row: Flint, 
Snider, Brown, Zucker, Sullivan, Balfour, Fitzmorris. 



First Year 



® a 9 



x 



a 



HI 



Af O j ^ 






First Row: Blood, Rowe, Rohrs, Richardson, Cook. Second Row: Heroy, Perera, Weinstein, Molavi, Dranitzke. Third Row: 
Greer, Burgin, Selvey, Schackman, Raybin, Donham, Adler. Fourth Row: Pupio, Benjamin, Wheeler, Barzun, Sears, Dennis. 

42 





B 




§5 p 



v l '\ ' } - 1 7 

lo "P ft JO I 



4*M 




First Row: Dallow, Stewart, Waters, Cory. Second Row: Ferguson, Harris, Hamilton, Mathews, Mer. Third Row: Salenger, 
Spotnilz, Fieger, Arnsdorf, Ballo, Flamenbaum. Brauninger. Fourth Row: Belcher, Baratta, Bank, Giventer. Hilde- 
brand, Taylor, Mackenzie. 



1966 

vl si 




tekMttd 



First Row: Saj, Gerstein. Cohen, Drusen, Rudolph. Second Row: Murray, Tholfsen, Goldberg, Cohen, Schachter, 
Chen. Third Row: Palatucci, Shields. Srinivasan, Lightdale, Giargiana, Glick, Perm. Baker, McCIellan, Carraway. 
Fourth Row: Pauley, Tucker, Kirsner, Scott, Ashman, Muller, Alexander, Nisonson. 



43 







o « a 





First flow;: Finkelstein, Mooney, Keyser, Lambert, O'Connor. 
Second Roiv: Glenn, Schuker, Hall, McCullough, Lane, Abelson. 
Third Row: Frester, Ratzan, Pearl, O'Brien, Scheidt, Johnson, 
Delbarco, Bryant. Fourth Row: Simmons, Iseman, Mattern, 
Perkins, Rofman, Weld, Schachter. 




First Row: Rose, Urbach, Davis, Wallace, Schurman. Second 
Row: Bohnen, Taylor, Bluming, Steele, Beyer. Third Row: 
Weingarten, Kripke, Miller, Culver, Oparil, Mallis, Levy, 
Kurtin. Fourth Row: Sobol, Hadden, Bergoma, Hale, Cottrell, 
Elting, Stanley, Siegal. 



Second Year— 1965 







First Row: Redmond, Branscom, Myerson, Garfein, Singer. Second Row: Symington, Jainchill, Falk, Ackley, Wlodkoski, 
Cottrell. Third Row: Lopano, MacmiUan, Condon, Lyden, Horan, Bach, Borkenhagen, Hamada, Carida. First Row: Long- 
streth, Hertz, Guinsburg, Edie, St. John, Peterson, Meyerson, Thompson. 







& s /-F>*P ^ o P 

i ^ i C, ^ w a r> v 




First Row: Schreiber, Davidson, Turvey, Barth. Second Roiv: Rechler, Willner, Donahoe, Grollman, Takakoshi. 
Third Row: Kaplan, Henriquez, Lewis, Blume, Rogal, Friedberg, Andrews. Fourth Row: Hamilton, Reilly, Gregg, 
Parson, Mullikan, McCarthy, Stein. 



Third Year- 1964 




First Row: Porter, Fryer. Zipf, Mannar, Musgrave. Second Row: Ogawa, Vetter, Upton, Stein. Gelfand. Third 
Row: Dent, Doctoroff, Rapapport, Wilson, Groder, Cervino, Kirschner, Poliakoff, Wood. Fourth Row: Gilbert, 
Frank. Mayer, Robbins, Hoyte, Stilley, Forrest. 

45 



Notes on the History of P & S 



Few members of the Class of 1963 
will have forgotten the morning during 
the first year when Dean Merritt presented 
to us the complex plans for the fifty mil- 
lion dollar expansion of the Columbia- 
Presbyterian Medical Center. Many may 
think that P & S has always grown by such 
rational means. However, a look at the 
history of the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons will quickly change this impres- 
sion. Perhaps a brief recapitulation of a 
few aspects of this history will convey some 
flavor of the early days of the school. 

In part, the history of P & S is, of 
course, the intricate narrative of the or- 
ganization and reorganization of the insti- 
tution. On August 4, 1767 Samuel Clossey, 
Peter Middleton, John Jones, James Smith, 
and Samuel Bard petitioned the Governors 
of King's College (now Columbia Uni- 
versity) to establish a "School of Physick 
... to instruct Pupils in the most necessary 
and useful Branches of Medicine" in order 
"to rescue this benificent Branch of Learn- 
ing from the Obscurity which still con- 
tinues to veil it in this place, and prevent 
for the future if possible ye many scanda- 
lous and pernicious Abuses in the Prac- 
tice." Ten days later the Governors of 
the College noted "that the establishment 
thereby proposed will not only lend to the 
honor and reputation of this college in 
particular, but be also a public benefit 
to society" and then established the School 
with the above men (and John Tennent) as 
the first faculty. In November of that year 
the School opened and two years later, in 




College of Physicians and Surgeons at 3 Barclay 
Street, 1813-1837. 

1769, the baccalaureate degrees in med- 
icine were bestowed upon Robert Tucker 
and Samuel Kissam. 

One year earlier, however, the College 
of Philadelphia (later the University of 
Pennsylvania), which had established its 
medical school in 1765, had granted the 
bachelor's degree in medicine to four men. 
But the race to give the first doctor of 
medicine degree was won by King's Col- 
lege in 1770 when Robert Tucker was so 
honored. Thus although not the oldest 
medical school in this country, Columbia 
was the first to grant the doctorate in 
course — a point of an extraordinarily con- 
tentious nature between Columbia and 
Pennsylvania at that time and for many 
years after. 

Despite the significance of the above ac- 
complishment, the medical school of King's 
College did not fare well in the following 
years. It was closed, as was all of the Col- 
lege, during the Revolutionary War and 
never regained its original impetus after 
that. Reorganizations were attempted in 



46 



1784 ami [792, but after having graduated 
only twenty-four students in its existence, 
the school was disbanded in 1813. 

However, in 1807 a charter establishing 
a College of Physicians and Surgeons had 
been granted to the .Medical Society of the 
County of New Y>rk. The Society's Presi- 
dent. Nicholas Romayne, had been peti- 
tioning the Regents of the State to do this 
for more than fifteen years, but King's 
College had used its then great influence 
(including the word of Alexander Hamilton) 
to block the chartering. In the end it was 
quite fortunate that the decree of 1807 had 
at last been issued, for it was to the new 
College of Physicians and Surgeons that 
the medical faculty of King's College trans- 
ferred in 1813. Forty-seven years later a 
relationship between the two schools was 
established when P & S became the Med- 
ical Department of Columbia College. In- 
tegration was not really completed until 
1891 when P & S surrendered its charter, 
buildings, and endowments to Columbia. 
However, even then it kept two sacred 
prerogatives: the right to nominate its 
own faculty and the right to refuse in- 
struction to women unless its own faculty 
consented. 

The diverse relationships of P & S with 
the hospitals of New York constitute an 
equally intriguing and important part of 
its history. Samuel Bard, who had become 
the Professor of the Theory and Practice 
of Physick with the opening of the School, 
delivered a "Discourse Upon the Duties of 
a Physician, with some Sentiments on 
the Usefulness & Necessity of a Public 
Hospital" at the first commencement in 
1769. His speech was so moving that those 
in attendance, including the Governor of 



New York, Sir Henry Moore, subscribed 
that very afternoon one thousand pounds 
for the erection of the first New York hos- 
pital for the poor. By the beginning of the 
Revolution the New York Hospital was 
functioning, despite a catastrophic fire, 
to treat injured soldiers (of both sides). 
It was here that for many years P & S 
students received most of their clinical 
instruction. The details of the affiliations 
of the school with other hospitals, such as 
Bellevue, St. Lukes, Roosevelt, and Mary 
Imogene Bassett, are quite interesting but 
can not be recounted here. However, it 
should be noted that the agreement be- 
tween Columbia and Presbyterian Hos- 
pital, one hundred and fifty years later, 
which led to the establishment of the 
present Medical Center occurred despite 
numerous other proposed types of affilia- 
tion and locations primarily because of 
the steadfastness of a few men, especi- 
ally Edward Harkness. 

As with the story of any school, that of 
P& S is also concerned with the series of 
buildings it has occupied. Instruction was 
first held in the main building of King's 
College. However, in 1774 we find a peti- 



iiiifti.il in i 



m 



T 

Br 



~ ■••KjV' 



HI 



u 



:■:'.,( 
Il 



IS 




College building on Fourth Ave. and 23rd Street. 1856-1887 



47 



tion of Doctors Clossey, Jones and Bard to 
allow them to give their lectures in their 
own homes because the students and 
faculty found "daily attendance in the 
College Hall (which at best is but an un- 
comfortable place) in the depth of Winter 
really burthensome." Introductory and pub- 
lic lectures were continued in the main 
building, however. 

By 1813 the College had secured an 
adequate building on Barclay Street (two 
blocks from City Hall) after having oc- 
cupied briefly two smaller structures. With 
the growth of New York City during the 
next century, the site of the school stead- 
ily progressed northward and the buildings 
grew wider and taller. The building oc- 
cupied between 1856 and 1887 is of par- 
ticular note because of the description of 
it in Edward Trudeau's account of his 
medical school days. He wrote: "the Col- 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons was then 
(1868) a not very imposing institution on 
the corner of Twenty-third Street and 
Fourth Avenue, and very appropriately had 
a drug store and an ice cream saloon oc- 
cupying the basement of the high-stooped 
three-story building which was devoted to 
the uses of the College." 

That important policies have been 
strongly influenced by considerations of 
brick and mortar is well exemplified by a 
fairly authoritative account of the admis- 
sion of women to the first year class in 1918. 
By 1910 the building on 59th Street, which 
had been constructed twenty-three years 
earlier, was grossly deficient in laboratory 
space for all but the oldest sciences of 
anatomy and physiology. (This pattern 
of the capture and then loss of floor 
space by various departments, with the 



evolution of medical science, is the theme 
in the changing design as successive 
buildings were occupied.) At the same time 
there was growing pressure from outside 
and within the University to admit women 
medical students. Finally in 1916 the 
faculty agreed to accept women whenever 
proper physical arrangements could be 
made for them. It appears that the faculty 
really wanted new laboratories and was 
even willing to make this sacrifice to get 
them. In 1918 a research annex was opened 
and eleven (a numerical constant?) women 
were admitted. 

Another aspect of the history of the 
properties of P & S illustrates the possible 
utility of rational plans for the future. Al- 
though Samuel Bard had long been in- 
terested in botany and its relation to 
medicine, it was not until David Hosack 
became Professor of Materia Medica that 
practical steps were taken to provide 
facilities for these studies. In 1801 Hosack 
bought for five thousand dollars the area be- 
tween 47th and 51st Streets and Middle 
(5th Avenue) and Albany (6th Avenue) 
Roads, after having tried unsuccessfully 
for many years to get the medical school 
or the State to acquire it. He spent a great 
deal more money and converted this acre- 
age into the Elgin Botanical Garden "as a 
repository of native plants, and as sub- 
servient to medicine, agriculture, and the 
arts." However, the upkeep was too great 
for Hosack alone and the State finally 
bought it in 1810 for the benefit of all 
medical students. Four years later the Gar- 
den was given to P & S when the Regents of 
the State also found the cost of mainten- 
ance too great. Gradually interest in med- 
icinal herbs withered and the College, later 




A Fifty-Million dollar face-lifting. 

the University, found it profitable to rent 
portions of the property. Since 1928 the 
lease of this land to the Rockefeller 
Center has supplied Columbia University 
and its medical school with a significant 
portion of their operating expenses. 

The dominant role of the personalities 
of the faculty, administrators, and bene- 
factors, however, also must not be ne- 
glected. That from the beginning it was but 
a few men who shaped the development of 
the College and made obsolete the existing 
order will perhaps be better appreciated 
after two, of many possible, examples. 

In 1806. after having taken his medical 
degree at King's College, Valentine Mott 
went to Europe to continue his studies in 
England and France. Three years later, at 
the age of twenty-four, he returned and 
"feeling the competence of genius" peti- 
tioned the Trustees to allow him to lec- 
ture and demonstrate in operative surgery. 
This had never been done before in New 
York but the Trustees acquiesced, and two 
years later made him the first Professor of 
Surgery. This honor did not change him and 
the remainder of his life was filled with 
activities which included pioneering new 
operations, robbing graves for anatomical 
material, and frequent travels garnering 
positions at other institutions throughout 
the world. 



About one-half century later, when 
Francis Delafield debarked from his post- 
graduate studies in Europe, an equally im- 
portant change in the tide of medical ed- 
ucation occurred. Delafield returned from 
\ irchow's laboratory convinced of the im- 
portance of the study of pathology at the 
cellular level. He was instrumental, against 
much opposition, in freeing the Department 
of Pathology from being a mere branch of 
Medicine and helped systematize the ana- 
tomical study of disease. But more im- 
portantly. Delafield was convinced of 
the importance of laboratory work by 
medical students and with the aid of money 
from the Alumni Association instituted 
and directed the first facility at P & S 
where students could appreciate the meth- 
ods of research and their importance. 

These notes illustrate, for the most part, 
that the path of development of the Col- 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons has often 
been much of a surprise, even to its own 
faculty and administration. But perhaps 
if one examines the history of any great 
institution this phenomenon comes to light. 
The only just view, in any such retrospec- 
tion, is that expressed by Arthur Purdy 
Stout: "let us not forget that there has 
been no increase in intelligence and if the 
Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center has 
a dominant position in world medicine to- 
day, it is because of the foresight and de- 
voted labors of our professional fore- 
fathers who . . . gave the present genera- 
tion its great opportunities." 



The facts for these notes are drawn primarily from the writ- 
ings of Albert R. Lamb. Frederick S. Lee, John Shrady . Arthur 
Purdy Stout, and Jerome P. Webster. 



Alan N. Schechter 



Administration 




H. HOUSTON MERRITT, Vice President in Charge 
of Medical Affairs: Dean of the Faculty of Medicine. 



GEORGE A. PERERA, Associate Dean 




50 




AURA E. SEVERINGHAUS, Associate Dean of the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons from 1945 to 1962. 




£ 




EDWIN M. BARTON, Director of Student 
Activities and the P and S Club. 



PATRICK HAYES, Director of Bard Hall. 



51 



The Faculty 



Precl 



mica 



IS 



ciences 




Left: WILFRED M. COPENHAVER, Professor of Anatomy: 
All this will make sense when you take gross Anatomy. Below: 
GEORGE K. SMELSER, Professor of Anatomy: I've formed an 
attachment for my retina. 






Left: GEORGE D. PAPPAS, Assistant 
Professor of Anatomy: I tawt I taw a 
poody tat. Above: MELVIN L. MOSS, 
Associate Professor of Anatomy: A 
funny thing happened on the way to the 
anatomy lab. Right: FREDERICK 
AGATE, Associate Professor of Anat- 
omy: At autopsy, these are usually 
found in the head. 




52 





Above: HERBERT O. ELFTMAN, Professor of 
Anatomy: Last on the boards again? 



Above: CHARLES A. ELY, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Anatomy: Whoops, I've swallowed 
my recurrent . . . 





Above: MALCOLM CARPENTER, Professor of Anatomy: 
This is the Locus Caeruleus — Color it blue. 



Above: CHARLES R. NOBACK, Associate 
Professor of Anatomy: Where did I put the 
Instructions — it should all fit together in 
the end. 





Above: WALTER S. ROOT, Professor of 
Physiology: No officer, 1*11 come along 
quietly. 



Above: MAGNUS I. GREGERSEN, John 
C. Dalton Professor of Physiology: At 
last -T- 1825. 




Above: WILLIAM W. WALCOTT, Associate Professor of 
Physiology: It's still alive? Right: LOUIS J. CIZEK, Asso- 
ciate Professor of Physiology: Yeah, it's wet when it comes 
out. 






Above: DAVID RITTENBERG, Professor of Biochemistry: My 
son, the Doctor! Above right: ALVIN KRASNA, Assistant 
Professor of Biochemistry: So that's what you get when you con- 
nect the dots. Right: DAVID SHEMIN, Professor of Biochem- 
istry: David who? 




54 



Below: ERWIN CHARGAFF, Professor of Biochemistry: I vill 
not contribute to ze Vatson-Crick scholarship fund. 






Above: DAVID NACHMANSON, Professor of Biochemistry: You 
have some nerve. Below: PARITHYCHERY SRINIVASAN, 

Assistant Professor of Biochemistry: It's just like Smith in New 
Delhi. 




Above: GEORGE L. SAIGER, Associate Professor of Epidemi- 
ology: WHO did you say is not significant? Right: DAVID 
SPRINSON, Professor of Biochemistry: And this is the structure 
of glucose (or is it xylose)? 






55 





m^m 






lr iillll 




mm 








yMi 


^mr \ 


\ At 








_ 


'"^^H 


Nai 


'■'v.''. '■■'. 1 1 < 


1 ^w 







Le/f: HARRY M. ROSE, John E. Borne Professor of Micro- 
biology: I've ruled out abdominal actinomycosis, ergo it must 
be intestinal flu. Below: ELVIN A. KABAT, Professor of Micro- 
biology: I've just determined the LD-50 for Dextran in medical 
students. 



Below: BEATRICE C. SEEGAL, Professor of Microbiology: 
And now Mr. Collingwood, let me show you David's throne room. 
Below center: CALDERON HOWE, Professor of Microbiology: 
Any queries? 





^ il 




Left: COUNCILMAN MORGAN, Associate Professor of Micro- 
biology: Dere's nuttin' mechanically wrong with dis washer, lady. 
Above: SAM M. BEISER, Associate Professor of Microbiology: 
Harry, play the Chubby Checkers one again. 



56 



Right: STUART W. TANENBAUM, Associate Professor of 
Microbiology: Did he say his name was Coli? Below: GABRIEL 
GODMAN, Associate Professor of Microbiology': What do you 
mean, you can't hear me — I'm shouting. 








Above: ROGER W. WILLIAMS. Associate Professor of Medical 
Entomology: Bellevue Surgery needs 10,000 maggots. Above 
center: LEONARD GOLDWATER. Professor of Occupational 
Medicine: You say there are giant fomites attacking New York? 
Above right: KATHLEEN L. HUSSEY. Associate Professor of 
Parasitology: File it under P, for purged. Right: HAROLD W. 
BROWN, Professor of Public Health: I'm putting snails into the 
Bard Hall Pool. 




57 




Left: HARRY B. VAN DYKE, David Hosack 
Professor of Pharmacology: Humph, what do 
you mean, my bowtie is too tight? 





Above: HERBERT J. BARTELSTONE, 
Assistant Professor of Pharmacology: 
INH and PAS — A medically proven com- 
bination of ingredients that works just 
like a doctor's prescription. 




Above: SHIH-CHUN WANG, Professor 
of Pharmacology: Dog retch . . . 




. Ah, dog womit. 




■ — ^ 



r 




Above: WILBUR H. SAWYER, Asso- 
ciate Professor of Pharmacology: To- 
morrow I'll talk about Doan's Pills. 



Left: FREDERICK G. HOFMANN, As- 
sociate Professor of Pharmacology: To 
be or not to be. that is the question . . . 



58 




Above: DONALD G. McKAY, Francis Delafield Professor of 
Pathology: I'd consider it an honor to flunk out of P & S. 



Above: RAFFAELE LATTES, Professor of Surgical Pathology: 
If there only were some way I could keep it from eating the slides. 





Left: VIRGINIA KNEELAND FRANTZ, Professor Emeritus 
of Surgery: We sent this one to Crile. Above: If they won't let 
me in the operating room, I'll play in here. 




Left: NATHAN LANE. Associate Professor of 

Surgical Pathology: What do you mean you can't 
get that lumphnode through the door? Above: DA- 
VID SPIRO, Associate Professor of Pathology: 
Uhhh, I'd call this a typical Nephrotic Ribosome. 




59 



The Clinical Years 



I have three personal ideals. One, to do the day's work well and not to bother about tomorrow — The second 
ideal has been to act the Golden Rule, as far as in me lay, toward my professional brethren and toward the 
patients committed to my care. And the third has been to cultivate such a measure of equanimity as would 
enable me to bear success with humility, the affection of my friends without pride, the day of sorrow and grief 
with the courage befitting a man. 

Sir William Osier 




Above: STANLEY E. BRADLEY, Samuel Bard Professor of 
Medicine. 





Above: The only thing you have to fear is fear itself. 



Above: Ah, I think I've found the spleen. 
Right: Do you think it could be my 
liver? 





60 




I.rli. \ UK KNEELAND. JR., Professor of Med- 
icine: Jennie Cleveland i* hack again? Below: 
HAMILTON SOUTHWORTH, Clinical Professor 
ol Medicine: l*m selling my Combined Clinic Notes 
to the faculty. 





Left: DANA W. ATCHLEY, Professor Emeritus of Clinical Medicine and 
GEORGE W. MELCHER, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine: Yes 
George, it seems you're the LMD. Below left: GEORGE A. PERERA. 
Professor of Medicine and Associate Dean: Make your seventh choice a 
wise one. Below: ALFRED GELLHORN, Professor of Medicine: Bence- 
Jones average up 3 points. 






Left: ALFRED P. FISHMAN, Associate 
Professor of Medicine: Who told you an 
arterial puncture hurts? Right: ALBERT 
W. GROKOEST, Assistant Professor of 
Clinical Medicine: I've tried Colchicine, 
but it won't straighten outi Below left: 
STUART W. COSGR1FF, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Clinical Medicine: Blood should 
be thinner than water. Below right: 
DAVID SCHACHTER, Associate Profes- 
sor of Medicine: I'd call it the runs. 







Left: DONALD TAPLEY, Assistant Professor of Medicine: 
"M.O.M. in A.M. if no B.M. in P.M. "-indeed! Below: ALBERT 
R. LAMB, JR., Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine: Its 
fun being Columbia's LMD. 




62 



Right: JOHN \. TAGGART, Professor of Medicine 
and Professor of Physiology, Chairman of Department 
->f Physiology: I'm calling it L-3307. Below: KERMIT 
L. PINKS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine: 
It smells like acetone, but I can't be sure. Far below: 
JOHN H. LARAGH, Associate Professor of Clinical 
Medicine: It all began when mom put loo much salt 
in my formula. 






Above: ELLIOT OSSERMAN, Associate Professor of Medicine: Why 
don't we just say Large Globulins? Below center: NICHOLAS V. 
CHRISTY, Associate Professor of Medicine: Now where did Loeb leave 
his toga? Below right: FREDERICK R. BAILEY, Clinical Professor of 
Medicine: My name is not Bill and I won't come home! 






63 





v 






Above: CHARLES RAGAN, Samuel W. Lambert Professor of Medicine, Belle- 
vue Hospital: Tell the Girls I said to use Dig. Above right: REJANE HARVEY, 
Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine: Very funny, who's got my stethoscope? 



I 



Below: ANDRE F. COURNAND, Westchester Heart Association 
Professor of Cardiovascular Research: Every little wheeze seems 
to whisper Louise. Below right: DICKINSON W. RICHARDS, 
Special Lecturer and Samuel Lambert Professor Emeritus of 
Medicine: Looks like a URI: let's catheterize him. 



M. IRENE FERRER, Asso- 
ciate Clinical Professor of 
Medicine: An Umbilical lead 
might help. 







Above: JOHN LLTMANN. Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Medicine: My God, I've been 
multiplying by 400 instead of 40. Right: 
ARTHUR R. WERTHEIM. Associate 
Professor of Medicine: . . . and the mail 
boat comes every Thursday. 



Left: CHARLES A. FLOOD. 
Associate Professor of Clin- 
ical Medicine: They're 
ing bezoar on a bun. Right: 
ROBERT C. DARLING, Si- 
mon Baruch Professor of 
Physical Medicine and Re- 
habilitation: Today we'll 
start him on pick-up sticks. 





Left: MRS. TOWNSEND. Group Clinic aid: 
I Know its 12:30, but she travelled all the way 
from Bufflalo. Right: MRS. RAY: Disposition 
-LCH? 




Left: CHARLES CHRISTIAN: Assistant 
Professor of Medicine: And now for the 
Clinitest tablet. Right: GERARD M. 
TURINO, Assistant Professor of Med- 
icine: Who's Jerry Wider? Below: 
HENRY ARANOW, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Clinical Medicine: What does 
carboxyhemoglobin have to do with it? 








EDWARD C. CURNEN, Reuben S. 
Carpentier Professor of Pediatrics: 
What do you mean they substituted salt 
for the sugar in my morning formula. 




Above: SIDNEY C. WERNER, Associate Professor of 
Clinical Medicine: Do you know a good book on the 
thyroid? Below: HATTIE ALEXANDER, Professor of 
Pediatrics: Appendicitis? — you haven't ruled out 
Listeria meningitis! 







66 




Above: JAMES A. WOLFF, Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics: 
Tired blood at her age? 









Above left: RUTH C. HARRIS, Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics: A liver sliver from a yellow fellow. Center: MELVIN M. GRUM- 
BACH, Associate Professor of Pediatrics: You have the biggest Y Chromosome I've ever seen. Right: WILLIAM A. SILVERMAN, 
Associate Professor of Pediatrics: You mean its supposed to take nine months? 




Left: DAVID A. BAKER, Assistant Professor of 
Radiology: I said no machine on the sides. Right: 
HERBERT COHEN, Instructor in Pediatrics: Let's 
see, 14 boxes of wheat germ . . . 



67 








m 





Above left: DOROTHY H. ANDERSEN, Professor of Pathology. Center: DOUGLAS S. 
DAMROSCH, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. Look, ma, no cavities. Right: (CATHER- 
INE SPRUNT, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. And this one failed to thrive. 




Left: WILLIAM A. BAUMAN, Assistant 
Clinical Professor of Pediatrics. He's 
got good aim for a six-month-old. Above: 
SIDNEY BLUMENTHAL, Professor 
of Clinical Pediatrics. Hmm, so he's got 
squatter's rights. 





Above: WILLIAM A. BLANC, Associate Professor of 
Pathology. Feelthy peectures. Left: JOHN M. BRUSH, 
Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics. This may 
shock you, but . . . 





Above: H. HOUSTON MERRITT, Dean, and Professor of 
Neurology. So I says to Ike . . . 



Above: J. LAWRENCE POOL, Professor of Neurological 
Surgery. It's all in his head, so we're taking it out. 




Left: CARMINE T. VICALE, Professor 
of Clinical Neurology. No, son, we don't 
use M.O.M. to elicit rapid succession 
movements. Right: ABNER WOLF, 
Professor of Neuropathology. No . . . 
tap. tap . . . necking in the . . . tap, tap 
. . . balcony. 




Right: WILLIAM AMOLS, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Clinical Neurology. Stop kicking 
and rolling on the floor and tell me what's 
wrong. Far right: ELI S. GOLDENSOHN, 
Associate Professor of Neurology. When I 
press here, my toes fan out. 





69 




Left: SIDNEY CARTER, Pro- 
fessor of Neurology: A kid with a 
10 and 5/8 hat? Right: DANIEL 
SCIARRA, Associate Professor 
of Clinical Neurology: Concen- 
trate on the hammer and forget 
about my other hand. 




Left: LEWIS P. ROWLAND, As- 
sistant Professor of Neurology: 
I can't get this pipe out of my 
mouth. Right: ROBERT A. FISH- 
MAN, Assistant Professor of 
Neurology: So what can you learn 
from a lumbar puncture, any- 
way? 





Below: LAWRENCE C. KOLB, Professor of Psychiatry: I 
want a girl just like the girl that married dear old dad. 



Below: WILLIAM A. HORWITZ, Pro- 
fessor of Clinical Psychiatry: This time 
just give her a little setz. 





70 



Below: ISRAEL KESSELBRENNER, Assistant Clinical Profes- 
sor of Psychiatry: What do you mean, you haven't been? Right: 
DONALD S. KORNFELD, Instructor in Psychiatry: Of course 
my desk is always this neat. 








Left: H. DONALD DUNTON, Assistant 
Clinical Professor of Psychiatry: No, 
really, it's just a pipe. Right: SIDNEY 
MALITZ, Assistant Clinical Professor of 
Psychiatry: Go on, I'll try not to laugh. 





Left: HILDE BRUCH, Clinical Professor of 
Psychiatry: Have you tried safflower oil? Right: 
PHILLIP POLATIN, Professor of Clinical 
Psychiatry: Ugh, with a chicken? 




71 




Left: WILLIAM S. LANGFORD, Pro- 
fessor of Psychiatry: Let's leave your 
mother out of this. Right: SHERVERT H. 
FRAZIER, Assistant Professor of Psy- 
chiatry: Let's not get anxietous about it. 




Right: CARL R. FEIND, In- 
structor in Surgery: Dr. Bradley 
stepped on it last Friday morn- 
ing? Far right: PHILIP D. 
WIEDEL, Assistant Professor of 
Clinical Surgery: I never wear it 
when I'm alone in the office. 





i 1 ' v'lfl 



j^ 




'I 




Above: ROBERT H. E. ELLIOT, JR., Associate Professor 
of Clinical Surgery: It'll cost 25 G's to take off yer finger- 
prints. 



Above: HAROLD G. BARKER, Associate 
Professor of Clinical Surgery: On a martini 
glass? 




Above: GEORGE H. HUMPHREYS II, Valentine Molt Professor of Surgery. 




1% 

Above: Cutting for the stone 



- 



Above: A wound infection ... is boiling oil still in the pharmacopoeia? 
Right: We must band together to keep Britain out of the Common Market. 




73 




Left: MILTON R. PORTER, Associate 
Professor of Clinical Surgery: Atchley wants 
me to do the case? Right: HUGH AUCHIN- 
CLOSS, JR., Assistant Clinical Professor 
of Surgery: Goodnight, Jackie; goodnight, 
Bobby; goodnight, Teddy; goodnight, Ethel. . 



Right: GRANT SANGER, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Clinical Surgery: Mother put me 
before her career. Far right: EDMUND N. 
GOODMAN, Assistant Clinical Professor of 
Surgery: You recognize me by my marvelous 
tan? 







Left: ARTHUR B. VOORHEES, Instruc- 
tor in Surgery: And I can do end-to-sides 
one-handed. Right: EMANUEL M. PAP- 
PER, Professor of Anesthesiology: The 
truant officer never caught me. 



74 






Left: CUSHMAN D. HAAGENSEN, Pro- 
fessor of Clinical Surgery: I dreamt I went 
to the OR in my maidenform bra. Above: 
JOSE M. FERRER, Clinical Professor of 
Surgery: You think you've got in-law 
troubles? 



r*p 



Above: RUDOLF N. SCHULLINGER, 
Professor Emeritus of Clinical Surgery: 
What is a Hoover Remover Maneuver? 




Above: DAVID V. HABIF, Professor of Clinical Surgery: They couldn't 
find your blood pressure in Group Clinic so they referred you here? 
Right: ROBERT B. HIATT, Associate Professor of Surgery: And after 
four years they found it was imperforate. 





Left: GEORGE F. CRIKELAIR, Professor 
of Clinical Surgery: What's wrong with 
the child's noses? Right: LUCIANO OZ- 
ZELLO, Assistant Professor of Surgical 
Pathology: They said a boy from Italy 
couldn't get anywhere in this department. 




75 




Left: SHIVAJI B. BHONSLAY, JR., 

Instructor in Surgery: Wait till Voorhees 
sees my new cobra graft. Right: JAMES 
R. MALM, Assistant Professor of Sur- 
gery: If it's enlarged, it's easier to find. 




fi w. 



1 




Below: CHARLES A. L. BASSETT, Associate Professor of 
Orthopedic Surgery: What do you mean, greasy kid stuff? 
Far below: CHARLES S. NEER II, Assistant Professor of 
Clinical Orthopedic Surgery: If we break it here and fuse it 
there, he'll be able to lay it right down on the desk. 



Above: FRANK E. STINCHFIELD, Professor of 
Orthopedic Surgery: The thigh bone's connected 
to the collar bone? Below: HOWARD C. TAYLOR, 
Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology: Chief of 
Cervix. 




Right: HARRISON J. MC- 
LAUGHLIN, Professor of 
Clinical Orthopedic Sur- 
gery: It's like nailing a 
custard pie to the wall. 




76 




Above: D. ANTHONY D"ESOPO. Professor of Clinical Ob- 
stetrics and Gynecology: Now you want them untied? Right: 
SAUL B. GUSBERG, Associate Professor of Clinical Ob- 
stetrics and Gynecology: . . . and Alan, get those slippery 
elms out of the office. 





Left: EMANUEL A. FRIEDMAN. Asso- 
ciate Professor of Obstetrics and Gyne- 
cology: Would you care to have me read 
this lecture again? Right: CHARLES M. 
STEER. Associate Professor of Clinical 
Obstetrics and Gynecology: Maybe grease 
would help. 





■ 



Far left: WILLIAM V. CAVANAGH. As- 
sociate Clinical Professor of Obstetrics 
and Gynecology: Size 95? Left: W. DUANE 
TODD, Instructor in Obstetrics and Gyne- 
cology: A footling-handling-noseling? 













Left: ANNA L. SOUTHAM, Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology: Excellent, that drops the median grade another five 
points. Center: RAYMOND L. VANDE-WIELE, Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology: Just think of it ... an obese, hirsute, 
post-menopausal thirteen-year-old woman. Right: GILBERT J. VOSBURGH, Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology: 
All right, Mrs. Jones, you can return to the ward now. 





^r 





Left: RALPH SCHLAEGER, Assistant Professor of Radiology: Very funny, who slipped "Lawrence of Arabia*' into the cine machine? 
Center: WILLIAM B. SEAMAN, Professor of Radiology: Not another barium peritonitis, Ralph. Right: JOHN K. LATTIMER, Pro- 
fessor of Urology: How to succeed in business without really trying. 




' 



Left: KENT ELLIS, Associate Professor of Radiology: 
So that's what they meant by "Proctoscopy to 80 cms." 




Left: CARL T. NELSON, Professor of Derm- 
atology: Furfuraceous, violaceous, sebac- 
eous . . . it's a wart. Right: PHILLIP LOW- 
ENFISH, Assistant Clinical Professor of 
Dermatology: If the blue undersurface is 
yellow under Woods Light — burn it. 



. 





Far left: CHARLES A. PERERA, Associate 
Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology: 
Hmm, perla. Left: ROBERT M. DAY, As- 
sistant Professor of Clinical Ophthalmol- 
ogy: 2 gtts. O.D. b.i.d., O.S. s.o.s. 




Left: EDMUND P. FOWLER, JR., Professor of 
Otolaryngology: Speak into the good ear, 
fella. Right: ROBERT M. HUI, Assistant 
Clinical Professor of Otolaryngology: Yes, Mr, 
van Gogh, we'll put it all together again. 





Far left: MILOS BASEK. Assistant Professor of 
Clinical Otolaryngology: I can't hear you. I have a 
banana in my ear. Left: JULES WALTNER, As- 
sociate Professor of Clinical Otolaryngology: 
Students do better when I give the exam in Hun- 
garian. 



The Peril of Pragmatism 



When I was asked to write a short 
article for the Yearbook I light-heartedly 
consented, without having any idea of what 
was to be said, or why. However I believe 
it is customary, in these circumstances, 
for the writer to take the shotgun approach 
to homily and let off both barrels — admoni- 
tion and advice — at the students, especi- 
ally those who have nearly finished the 
long trek through medical school and are 
about to become his colleagues, i.e., 
competitors. If this indeed is the custom, 
I must disregard it. I take for granted that 
the embryo physician has been, or will be, 
well brain-washed with viewpoints con- 
cerning the stature of his profession, the 
responsibility he assumes to people as well 
as persons, the changing compound of sci- 
ence and art that makes medicine some- 
thing more than just human biology, and 
the debts of accomplishment he owes to 
the past and has incurred for the future. 
These and all related subjects are a 
happy hunting ground for medical phil- 
osophers, and deans who must give com- 
mencement addresses, and of course they 
are important or I should not treat them 
so lightly. 

The student at the end of his fourth year 
is apt to be a rather blase fellow, lightly 
touched with cynicism, and on the whole 
pretty confident of himself, since he knows 
more of medicine than he ever did before, 
or ever will again. He is thus able to form 



By Harry M. Rose 




a more detached opinion, let us say, of 
what medicine is all about. But ten-to-one 
the chances are that if you scratch him you 
will scratch a technician, not a scientist. 
The reason for this is not hard to find: 
technical developments in clinical medicine 
have outrun the advance of basic knowl- 
edge in biology — one illustration being the 
dozens of commonly-used drugs whose way 
of action is unknown — and even though all 
biology, including medicine is based on 
science, the scientific method has certain 
limits of application. These limits in some 
areas (psychiatry is the best example) 



80 




Dr. Rose and Dr. Howe entertain at a Bard Hall faculty musieale. 

are still very narrow and are just begin- 
ning to enlarge, while throughout clinical 
medicine the gap between technical and 
scientific progress is not growing much 
smaller. In this situation the student, 
who has been carefully (we trust) taught 
in his preclinical years to appreciate and 
understand the rational approach to bio- 
logic problems, discovers that empiricism 
is still the clinician's closest friend and 
that technology has somehow acquired the 
attributes of science. 

He notices that there is, inescapably, a 
lot of technique for technique's sake — as 
in surgery. He also finds that a good part 
of specialization in medicine seems to de- 
pend on segregated technical know-how, 
so he may wonder, for instance, what the 
cardiologist would be without the electro- 
cardiograph, and what might happen to 
the urologist if he were not sole owner of 
the cystoscope. Such observations may fail 
to reach the full level of his consciousness, 
but they threaten to encourage a pragma- 



tism which can be further encouraged, even 
ingrained by his later experiences as an 
interne and resident. Herein lies a great 
danger. The pragmatic stance, which must 
be avoided as the cholera, is a popular 
and appealing attitude in medicine: it is 
simple (being based on someone else's 
ideas), requires only low-gear cerebration, 
pays off for the doctor as a business man, 
and even leads to acceptable patient care. 
But this practicality is perilous because it 
is concerned mainly with the trivia of 
technique, rather than with general prin- 
ciples, and therefore becomes incompatible 
with science, the foundation of medicine. 
No "practical man" will ever qualify 
under Whitehead's definition of "the good 
American doctor," a man who is sceptical 
toward the data of his own profession, 
welcomes discoveries which upset his 
previous hypotheses, and is still animated 
by human sympathy and understanding. 
Harry M. Rose, M.D. 




Dr. Kabat pays a call. 



81 



Internships 



Lanier Anderson, Passavant Memorial Hospital, Chicago 

William Aronson, Harbor General Hospital, Torrance, Cal. 

Albert Assali, Bellevue First Medical, New York 

Paul Bachner, Presbyterian Hospital, New York 

Leslie Baer, Presbyterian Hospital, New York 

Richard Banner, Strong Memorial, Rochester, N.Y. 

Le Clair Bissell, Roosevelt Hospital, New York 

Neil Blacklow, Beth Israel Hospital, Boston 

Norma Braun, Bellevue First Medical, New York 

Philip Briska, U.S. Naval Hospital, St. Albans, N.Y. 

Arthur Brown, Minneapolis General Hospital, Minnesota 

Robert Brown, Bellevue First Medical, New York 

David Bruce, DeGoesbriand Memorial Hospital, Burlington, 

Vermont 
Robert Burd, Bronx Municipal Hospital, New York 
Wayne D. Cannon, St. Vincent's Hospital, New York 
Clyde Chun, St. Luke's Hospital, New York 
Hallowed Churchill, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston 
Roger Cohen, Bellevue First Surgical, New York 
Robert Coli, New England Center Hospital, Boston 
Terrance Daugharty, King County Hospital, Seattle 
David Davidson, University of Pennsylvania Hospital, Phil- 
adelphia 
Susan Deakins, Roosevelt Hospital, New York 
Richard Dickey, Indiana University Medical Center, Indi- 
anapolis 
Louis E. Dickinson, Mary Hitchcock, Hanover, New Hampshire 
Michael Ehrlich, Bellevue First Medical, New York 
Murray Epstein, University Hospitals, Madison, Wisconsin 
Stephen Feig, Mount Sinai Hospital, New York 
Martin Feldman, Mount Sinai Hospital, New York 
Dudley Ferrari, New England Center, Boston 
Edwin Fischer, University Hospitals, Cleveland 
Susan Fisher, Bronx Hospital, New York 

Anne Gamble, University of Minnesota Hospitals, Minneapolis 
Martin Geller, Bronx Hospital, New York 
Sandra Grant, Passavant Memorial Hospital, Chicago 
Carl Hakanson, University of Virginia Hospital, Charlottesville 
George Harell, Bellevue First Medical, New York 
Robert Heissenbuttel, Presbyterian Hospital, New York 
Eugene Hoff, University of Chicago Clinics, Chicago 
Joel Hoffman, University Hospital, Ann Arbor 
Stuart Howards, Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, Boston 
Dennis Howie, St. Vincent's Hospital, New York 
Lawrence Hunsicker, Roosevelt Hospital, New York 
George Jordan, Stanford Hospital Center, Palo Alto 
Mark Kahn, Bronx Municipal Hospital Center, New York 
Lloyd Kamins, Kings County Hospital, New York 
David Kem, University Hospital, Ann Arbor 
Lawrence Krakoff, Presbyterian Hospital, New York 
Warren Krick, Charity Hospital, New Orleans 
Philip Larsen, Presbyterian Hospital, New York 
Conrad Lattes, Bellevue First Surgical, New York 
Albert Lesneski, St. Luke's Hospital, New York 
Myron Lewis, Vanderbilt University Hospital, Nashville 
Mayer Lightdale, Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami 
Jacob Lindy, Philadelphia General Hospital, Philadelphia 
Gerald Mackler, Mary Fletcher Hospital, Burlington, Vermont 
Avron Maletzky, Duke Hospital, Durham 
Alan Manzler, Presbyterian— St. Lukes, Chicago 
George Mauerman, Roosevelt Hospital, New York 
Elizabeth McSherry, San Francisco General Hospital, San 
Francisco 



Jost Michelsen, University Hospitals, Cleveland 
Daniel Morgan, Bellevue First Surgical, New York 
Paul Mosher, University of Washington, Seattle 
Peter Muehlbauer, Brooklyn Jewish Hospital, New York 
Harvard Muhm, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 
John Murphy, Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital, Cooperstown 
Daniel Musher, Bellevue First Medical, New York 
Peter Naiman, Bellevue First Surgical, New York 
Eva Neer, Georgetown University Hospital, Washington 
Bruce Nelson, University of California, Los Angeles 
Carmen Ortiz Neu, Georgetown University Hospital, Wash- 
ington 
William Nevel, U.S. Naval Hospital, Bethesda 
Marc Newberg, Presbvterian Hospital, New York 
John Noble, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston 
Richard Orahood, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 
Robert Page, Bellevue First Surgical, New York 
George Paris, Stanford Hospital Center, Palo Alto 
James Parker, University of Chicago Clinics, Chicago 
Thomas Parks, San Francisco General Hospital, San Francisco 
Richard Perlman, Bellevue First Surgical, New York 
David Pleasure, Mary Fletcher Hospital, Burlington, Vermont 
Jeanette Pleasure, Mary Fletcher Hospital, Burlington 
Mark Pohlman, Mary Imogene Bassett, Cooperstown 
Geraldine Poppa, Presbyterian Hospital, New York 
Michael Rappaport, Bronx Municipal Hospital, New York 
David Reifsnyder, St. Luke's Hospital, New York 
Joel Rein, Presbyterian Hospital, New York 
James C. Reynolds, Colorado General, Denver 
Stephen Rittenberg, Bronx Municipal, New York 
Maj-Britt Rosenbaum, Bronx Municipal, New York 
Martin Rosenblatt, Michael Reese, Chicago 
Richard Rudders, North Carolina Memorial, Chapel Hill 
Richard Ryder, Mary Imogene Bassett, Cooperstown 
Fred Sachs, Grace-New Haven, New Haven 
Robert Sade, Boston City, Harvard division, Boston 
Joel Saks, Joint Disease Hospital, New York 
Robert Schaefer, Vanderbilt University Hospital, Nashville 
Alan Schechter, Bronx Municipal, New York 
David Scheiner, University of Chicago Clinics, Chicago 
Alfred Scherzer, New York Hospital, New York 
William Schneider, University of Chicago Clinics, Chicago 
Stephen Schonberg, Colorado General, Denver 
David Schwartz, St. Luke's, New York 
Barbara Serber, Mary Fletcher, Burlington, Vermont 
Jonathan Serxner, Charity Hospital, New Orleans 
Jerome Shupack, Mount Sinai, New York 
Lawrence Silver, Mount Sinai, New York 
John Simmonds, Duke Hospital, Durham 
Charles Smith, University Hospitals, Cleveland 
Bernard Snyder, Medical College of Virginia, Richmond 
Leonard Steinfeld, Bronx Hospital, New York 
Charles Steinman, Presbyterian Hospital, New York 
Marc Taylor, Grace-New Haven, New Haven 
Fred Tiley, Strong Memorial, Rochester 
Eli Wayne, Boston City (Harvard division) Boston 
Babette Weksler, Bronx Municipal, New York 
Jerry Wider, Mount Sinai, New York 
Thomas Williams, Presbyterian Hospital, New York 
Howard Wolfinger, Health Center Hospitals, Pittsburgh 
Dean Wood, Letterman General, San Francisco 
Julian Zener, North Carolina Memorial, Chapel Hill 
Eugene Zweiback, Roosevelt Hospital, New York 



82 



Ads 



Adages 



Addendum 



83 



Less May Be More 



(Continued from page 8) 

rarely forgive you for wrong prognoses; 
the older you grow in medicine, the more 
chary you get about offering iron clad 
prognoses, good or bad." 

On another occasion this same teacher, 
being somewhat disturbed by the tendency 
of his young confreres to initiate a full 
diagnostic and therapeutic program on the 
patient's first day of entrv to the hospital, 
counselled us in these words: "The physi- 
ian has two sleeves, one containing a 
diagnostic and the other a therapeutic 
armamentarium; these sleeves should 
rarely be emptied in one move; keep some 
techniques in reserve; time your maneuvers 
to best serve the status and special needs 
of your patient." 

In my early interne days I found myself 
groping for value judgements in difficult 
diagnostic or therapeutic problems where 
the welter of medical facts did not permit 
a clear differentiation between the pro and 
the con decision. Peace of mind came my 
way when I heard a masterful clinician 
say: "This patient should be treated the 
way you would wish to be treated if you 
were that patient in that bed at that time." 
Provided that the physician has a single 
standard of conduct and the imagination 
to put himself in the patient's situation, 
I know of no more useful symbol of manage- 



ment in the doctor's bag. On the occasions 
of sharply and almost equally divided pro- 
fessional opinion as to procedure concern- 
ing a diagnostic or therapeutic matter, the 
responsible physician may decide to "sit 
tight," but if he chooses to act, he will 
learn that leaning on the pillar of the Golden 
Rule will give him the most satisfactory 
support. 

Thus as the IBM machine continues to 
whir in the Dean's office and I reflect on 
the torch of medical education, which each 
of us holds briefly and then passes on to 
others, I cannot forget the flammable value 
of my teachers' educative flashes as ex- 
pressed by the right sentence at the right 
time. Those few words often embraced a 
convincing concept and played a significant 
role as our instructors strove to bring out 
our latency, to stretch us, if you will. 
Some forty years later it is exhilarating to 
recall those moments of incandescence 
when suddenly we seemed a bit wiser, a 
bit more compassionate, even if we did 
not know and would never know all the 
answers. 

In retrospect it is intriguging to reflect 
on this dynamic and self-perpetuating edu- 
cational impact of the brief, pithy, relevant 
remark at the bedside: multum-in-parvo. 

David Seegal, M.D. 



84 



SOME QUALITIES OP THE COWPLEAT PHYSICIAN 




I t 



INTEREST m PEOPLE 







<-kA ftrs fy r 




HA5 SENSE Of VALUES 
SEES THE FOREStApW JHtJ 

a nun 



rVtT/EArS 



KNOWS HlS^CASES 

?! 




I 



HARP WORK - no riMf Lo 




DOES NOT USE A CANNON 
TO SHOOT A SPAkTOW 



LOOKJITL/P 

? 



KEEP5 FUSASEMFNTS 



DOES NOT USE A PfA-SHOOTfR 
TO HUNT AN ELEPHANT 



X 



LOOKS IT UP 



FRONT BA4K 




PRIDE IN WORK WELL DONE 



KNOWS HIS LIMITATIONS 
KNOWS wi«h we ncfoj nap 



NO 



YES 



GOLDEN RULE 
FOR WE CLOSE. SOWPI>ECI»0N 



Q 



/I 





In the above cartoon Dr. Seegal attempts to demonstrate that the principles guiding the good physician are the same uni- 
versal principles which apply to any field of endeavor. 



Profile 



David Seegal's career as physician and teacher 
has spanned the years of major medical progress in 
the United States. Born in Chelsea, Massachusetts, 
in 1899. he was educated at Harvard where he re- 
ceived his M.D. in 1928. He served as intern and 
resident at the Presbyterian Hospital and was ap- 
pointed Instructor in Medicine in 1930. In 1942 he 
was appointed director of the First Medical Divis- 
ion, Goldwater Memorial Hospital. During the war 
years he also acted as consultant on epidemic 
diseases to the Secretary of War. 

He studied (with Arthur Wertheim and his wife 
Beatrice Carrier Seegal) the etiology of glomerul- 
onephritis, especially helping to elucidate the 
identity of the nephritogenic strains. At Goldwater, 
he built the Columbia unit into a major research 
adjunct of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, 



surrounding himself with such noted clinicians 
and investigators as Arthur Patek. Forrest Kendall, 
Quentin Deming, Hylan Bickerman. Dr. Patek'3 in- 
vestigation of the nutritional etiology for cirrhosis 
is probably the major contribution to emerge from 
the Goldwater studies. 

Above all, Goldwater has been a training ground 
for the student. Both Dr. Seegal and Dr. Wertheim 
have made teaching the core of the Goldwater pro- 
gram. Feeling that they must "stretch" the capacity 
of the individual student to "bring out his latent 
talents," they provide an arduous teaching program. 

Dr. Seegal's career also includes the editorship 
of the Journal of Chronic Disease and membership 
in innumerable organizations including: The Harvey 
Society, American Society for Clinical Investiga- 
tion, Subcommittee on Internships and Residencies 
of the Association of American Medical Colleges, 
Committee on Medical Education of the New York 
Academy of Medicine. 



85 



This 
is a 
capsule*** 




i&r *w ^P and it looks deceptively simple. 
Certainly not as complex as an x-ray machine, a 
fully equipped operating room, or a modern 
pharmaceutical analysis laboratory. But appear- 
ances can be deceiving. Into this capsule went 
countless hours of research, the clinical investi- 
gation of thousands of patients by scores of 
physicians and finally-painstaking manufactur- 
ing controls. And-with the help of this capsule- 
physicians are able to provide more effective 
care for their patients. 



Smith Kline & French Laboratories 
is dedicated to the discovery and 
manufacture of these seemingly 
simple medicines . . . prescription 
drugs which have revolutionized 
the physician's treatment of his 
patients. 



SMITH KLINE & FRENCH LABORATORIES 




24-HOUR KODACHROME SERVICE 

Morn's Camera Shop 

3958 Broadway (166th Sr.) 

Opposite Medical Center 

Phone LO. 8-8590 

Special Discount to Students 


GOLDEN AGE RESTAURANT 

Specializing in 
SEAFOOD - STEAKS - CHOPS 

KZM FOOD, INC. 

4019 Broadway Corner 169th Street 
WA. 8-9845 


VIC GREENBAUM, INC. 

HABERDASHER 

McGregor Sportswear, Interwoven Hose, 

Manhattan, Lady Manhattan & Truval Shirts 

(Professional Discount) 

4009 Broadway (168th) WA. 3-4220 


THE MEDICAL CENTER BOOKSTORE 

EXTENDS ITS SINCEREST GOOD WISHES 

TO 

THE CLASS OF 1963 


It is astonishing with how little reading a 
doctor can practice medicine, but it is not 
astonishing how badly he way do it. 

— Osier 


SELBY L. TURNER 

Life Membership in Leader's Association 
Specialist In 

INSURANCE FOR PROFESSIONAL MEN 

233 Broadway, New York 7, N.Y. 
BEekman 3-6620 


TASTY DELICATESSEN 

FOR EXPERT CATERING 
Call WA. 3-0700 

4020 Broadway at 169th Street 



87 




oger Studios 



PORTRAITS OF 'DISTINCTION 



& 



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NEW YORK 32, NEW YORK 

Phone: WA. 7-7894 



<$ 



WE KEEP NEGATIVES OF YOUR PHOTOGRAPHS ON FILE 
FOR MANY YEARS AFTER GRADUATION 



Armory Restaurant 




FINE AMERICAN - ITALIAN FOOD 

Newly Redecorated Dining Room 

4001 Broadway bet 168th & 169th Sts. 


KRAMER 

SURGICAL STORES 


WA. 3-9034 


KRAMER SCIENTIFIC CORP. 

q? 

544 WEST 168th STREET 


look Wise, Soy Nothing, And Grunt. Speech Was 
Given To Conceal Thought. — Osier 


HEIGHTS r r , 

K^amera Center 


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Equipment And Supplies 
AT SPECIAL PRICES 






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Done On Premises 


WA. 7-5700 Lie. 532 


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Bet. 171st and 172nd Sts. 




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WINES AND LIQUORS 


WA. 3-3698 






Visit Our Wine Cellar 

3915 BROADWAY near 164th STREET 
NEW YORK 32, N. Y. 


Do Not Do Unto Others As You Would That They 
Should Do Unto You. Their Tastes May Not Be 
The Same. — G. B. Shaw 


COURTESY CARDS 

Medical Center Pharmacy 

Jacob Kaplan, F.A.C.A. 
4013 Broadway bet. 168th and 169th St! 

WA. 3-1258 
Specialists In Prescription Compounding 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF THE 



P & S 



ALUMNI 



ASSOCIATION 



TO EACH MEMBER OF 
THE CLASS OF 1963 

THE P&S ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

EXTENDS ITS BEST WISHES FOR 

A HAPPY AND SUCCESSFUL CAREER 



90 



Broadway Television Center Inc. 

SALES — COMPONENTS — SERVICE 
TV - STEREO - HI-FI 

(Discount to Medical Center Personnel) 

4058 Broadway at 171st St. SW. 5-6363 


Compliments of 

CARVEL 

Featuring 36 Home Made Ice Creams 

And Ice Cream Cakes For All Occasions 

1154 St. Nicholas Ave. opp. The Medical Center 


Everybody Complains Of His Memory, But No- 
body Of His Judgment. — La Rochefoucauld 


Tel: LO. 8-1230 

OLYMPIC BARBER SHOP 

NICK TSAKIRIDIS 

4021 Broadway New York 32 
Bet. 169th and 170th Sts. 


JOHN W. BUNGER 

GROCER 

FRUITS and VEGETABLES 

226 Ft. Washington Avenue 
Corner 169th Street 


TROPICAL 
GARDENS 

ON BROADWAY 

Bet. 169th and 170th Streets 

WA. 3-8918 


Best Wishes to the Class of 1 963 

Your Friendly Luncheonette 

TRUE HOMEMADE COOKING 

Between Bunger's and Appel's on 
Fart Washington Avenue at 169th St. 


For Prompt Call and Delivery Service 
Call WAshington Heights 7-3884 

D. APPEL 

EXPERT TAILOR, CLEANERS and DYERS 
and SHIRTS LAUNDERED 

230 Fort Washington Avenue 
Between 169th & 170th Streets 


Wadsworth 5 & 10c Stores 

Incorporated 
4050 Broadwoy bet. 170th & 171st Sts. 


Wherever A Doctor Cannot Do Good. He Must Be 
Kept From Doing Harm. —Hippocrates 


SILVER PALM 
LUNCHEONETTE 

4001 Broadway, Corner 168th St. 


Uptown Wines & Liquor Store 

Incorporated 

4033 Broadway at 170 Street 

New York 32, New York 

LO. 8-2100 



91 



OF 



BAUD 



HALL 



NELSON'S 


WA. 3-2424 "Say It With Flowers" 


KOSHER DELICATESSEN & RESTAURANT 

CATERERS 


Medical Center Flower Shop 

CARDASIS, INC., FLORIST 


Home Cooked Lunches 


ARTISTIC DECORATION FOR ALL OCCASIONS 


and Full Course Dinners 


The Flower Shop Nearest The Medical Center 


Wines - Liquors - Cocktails Served 

4041 Broadway (Corner 170th St.) 
WA. 3-9606 


"We Telegraph Flowers" 
4003 Broadway at 168th Street 


Compliments of 


GRUNE & STRATTON, INC 


MEDICAL AND SCIENTIFIC PUBLISHERS 


381 PARK AVENUE SOUTH 


New York 16, New York 


WA. 7-3233 

LARRY ORIN 


Luigi's Restaurant & Bar 


JEWELER 


WASHINGTON HEIGHT'S 


Electronically Tested Watch Repair 


LEADING ITALIAN RESTAURANT 


4009 Broadway at 168th Street 
New York 32, N. Y. 


1148 St. Nicholas Avenue 

Bet. 167th and 168th Stj. 


Special Discounts for Hospital Personnel 


WA. 3-9216-9217 



93 



BUILDERS 




NEW YORK WASHINGTON PARIS SAN JUAN 



COMPLIMENTS 



OF A 



FRIEND 



1 

Best Wishes to the Class of 1 963 

ORTHO PHARMACEUTICAL CORPORATION 

RARITAN, NEW JERSEY 


Compliments of 

SPEVACK 

SURGICAL SUPPLY 

Incorporated 

1345 NOSTRAND AVENUE 

BROOKLYN 26, NEW YORK 

BU. 2-7711 -2 

Complete Equipment Service 

from the 

Student to the Specialist 


REME RESTAURANT 

FOOD OF DISTINCTION 

4021 Broadway, Corner 169th St. 

New York City 

Air Conditioned 


KING CARD & BOOK SHOP 

4031! 2 Broadway bet. 169th and 170th Sts. 

SOCIAL AND BUSINESS PRINTING 

Hallmark Cards For All Occasions 


CENTER RESTAURANT & BAR 

ITALIAN-AMERICAN CUISINE 
Broadway at 165th St. WA. 3-9110-9230 



95 



With the Compliments of 

SANDOZ PHARMACEUTICALS 




Division of Sandoz, Inc. 

HANOVER, NEW JERSEY 



96 



Compliments of 

UNITY 
SURGICAL 

SUPPLIES, CO. 



1576 ST. JOHN'S PLACE 
BROOKLYN, NEW YORK 




Compliments of 

BRIDGE 
APARTMENTS 

Overlooking the Hudson at the Manhattan 
Approach to the George Washington Bridge 



An Historic 
Achievement by 




Renting Office - 1379 St. Nicholas Avenue 

SW. 5-9300 



Ringler-Rados Surgical Corp. 

OUR 40TH YEAR OF SERVICE 

Across From The Medical Center 

3958 Broadway WA. 7-2152 



DOM'S BARBER SHOP 

SPECIALIZING IN HAIR CUTTING 
MEN - LADIES - CHILDREN 

4005 Broadway, near 168th Street 
WA. 8-4910 



PIIVSII'IHS PLffilM SERVICE 

Corporation 

Group Insurance Administrators of 

The National Association of 
Residents & Interns, Inc. 



We Offer You The Finest 

Group Disability, and Deferred Payment 

Life Insurance Programs Available 

Write: 

JOEL KOENIG or NORM ROBINSON 

Physicians Planning Service Corp. 

247 PARK AVENUE NEW YORK 17, N. Y. 

YU. 6-0077 



Compliments of 

BARD HALL 

DINING ROOM 

and GRILL 



97 




Last night patients all over America 
had a good night's sleep with Doriden 

(glutethimide CIBA) 



From vast clinical experience, two facts about 
Doriden (glutethimide) have emerged: (1) 
It gives almost all patients a good night's 
sleep; (2) it can be prescribed with a high 
degree of safety for almost all patients. 

Note these specific advantages over the bar- 
biturates: rarely causes pre-excitation; onset 
of action is rapid, smooth; metabolized 
quickly, rarely produces morning "hang- 
over* 7 ; not contraindicated in the presence of 
liver and kidney disorders; well tolerated by 
elderly and chronically ill patients; rarely 
causes respiratory depression. 
Average Dosage: 0.5 Gin. at bedtime. Total 
daily dosage over 1 Gm. is not recommended 
for continuing therapy. 
2/3101MB 



Caution; Careful supervision of dosage is 
advised, especially for patients with a known 
propensity for taking excessive quantities of 
drugs. Excessive and prolonged use of Doriden 
(glutethimide) in susceptible persons, for ex- 
ample alcoholics, former addicts, and other 
severe psychoneurotics, lias sometimes re- 
sulted in dependence and withdrawal reac- 
tions. In those cases, dosage should be reduced 
gradually to lessen the likelihood of with- 
drawal reactions such as nausea, abdominal 
discomfort, tremors, or convulsions. 
Side Effects: Occasional reversible skin rash 
and nausea. 

Supplied: Tablets, 0.5 Gm., 0.25 Gm., and 

0.125 Gm. Capsules, 0.5. Gm. CIBA 

Summit, N. J. 



98 



REG.U.S.PAT.OFF. 

BETTER THINGS FOR BETTER LIVING 
. . . THROUGH CHEMISTRY 



E. I. DU PONT DE NEMOURS & COMPANY (INC.) 

INDUSTRIAL & BIOCHEMICALS DEPARTMENT 

WILMINGTON 98, DELAWARE 




<*£ £i*e HKKUdld fat icfaali 
and callepet evextfta6.e.ie. 



Established 1919 



H. G. Roebuck & Son, Inc. 

PRINTERS • LITHOGRAPHERS 



2140 Aisquith Street 

Baltimore 18, Md. 

HOpkins 7-6700 



PROUD PRODUCERS OF YOUR ANNUAL 



100 




The hands of friendship 

build great institutions. 

Our best wishes to 

our friends at Columbia. 

Chemical 
]\ew\brk 



CHEMICAL BANK NEW YORK TRUST COMPANY 



101 



Sponsors 



Dr. Hattie E. Alexander 

Dr. Dana W. Atchley 

Dr. Frederick R. Bailey 

Dr. and Mrs. William A. Bauman 

Dr. Sidney Blumenthal 

Dr. and Mrs. Stanley E. Bradley 

Dr. Harold W. Brown 

Dr. William V. Cavanagh 

Dr. Wilfred M. Copenhaver 

Dr. Stuart W. Cosgriff 

Dr. George F. Crikelair 

Dr. Edward C. Curnen, Jr. 

Dr. Douglas S. Damrosch 

Dr. Robert C. Darling 

Dr. A. Gerard DeVoe 

Dr. Robert H. E. Elliott, Jr. 

Dr. Carl R. Feind 

Dr. Charles A. Flood 

Dr. Edmund P. Fowler, Jr. 

Dr. Virginia K. Frantz 

Dr. Alexander Garcia 

Dr. Sawnie R. Gaston 

Dr. Alfred Gellhorn 

Dr. Eli S. Goldensohn 

Dr. Leonard J. Goldwater 

Dr. Edmund N. Goodman 

Dr. Albert W. Grokoest 

Dr. Cushman D. Haagensen 

Dr. David V. Habif 

Dr. Harold D. Harvey 

Dr. Robert B. Hiatt 

Dr. William A. Horwitz 

Dr. Calderon Howe 

Dr. Robert M. Hul 

Dr. George H. Humphreys, II 



Dr. Harold W. Jacox 
Dr. Elvin A. Kabat 
Dr. Yale Kneeland, Jr. 
Dr. Lawrence C. Kolb 
Dr. Donald S. Kornfeld 
Dr. John H. Laragh 
Dr. Raffaele Lattes 
Dr. John K. Lattimer 
Dr. Robert F. Loeb 
Dr. James R. Malm 
Dr. Donald G. McKay 
Dr. H. Houston Merritt 
Dr. Charles S. Neer, II 
Dr. Elliott F. Osserman 
Dr. Emanuel M. Papper 
Dr. George A. Perera 
Dr. Kermit L. Pines 
Dr. Phillip Polatin 
Dr. Milton R. Porter 
Dr. Charles A. Ragan 
Dr. Dickinson W. Richards 
Dr. Harry M. Rose 
Dr. Grant Sanger 
Dr. William B. Seaman 
Dr. Beatrice C. Seegal 
Dr. David Seegal 
Dr. Anna L. Southam 
Dr. Frank E. Stinchfield 
Dr. John V. Taggart 
Dr. Donald R. Tapley 
Dr. Howard C. Taylor 
Dr. Carmine T. Vicale 
Dr. Harry B. van Dyke 
Dr. Arthur R. Wertheim 



102 



GENESIS 



At the great Embryonal Softball Game, 

Where a covey of blastulae swarmed on the grass 

And a morula-batsman took careful aim 

At each sphere that was Hung by the Second Year Class 

There most of us sprawled on the grass far from harm 

And reached for a sandwich with pseudopod-arm. 

But the great white citadel, massive and tall 
Flung open the gates in its uterine wall. 

We began to develop, one cell at a time. 
And metabolized sugar and synthesized fat, 
So each nucleus bathed in a fluid sublime 
With reticular nets, and a wall around that . . . 
But the tissues broke loose in an organless swarm 
And we lined our intestines before they could form. 

And the great white citadel shining and fresh , 
Became filled with a mass of disorganized flesti 

So we built up a body, slowly, with love 

\$ ith skin on the top, and some muscles between; 

We covered each hand with a tendinous glove 

And next to each stomach inserted a spleen 

And we started to circulate, breathe and feel pain, 

And then in a pot, we discovered our brain! 

But the great white citadel tower of pride. 
Threw open its gates, and flung us outside. 

We wandered for months in a torment of fears 
Imperfect and groping and feeling perplexed 
For many of us were still lacking our ears 
And we could not form urine one day to the next, 
And the towering citadel answered our call. 
Reimplanting us in its decidual wall. 

But the great white citadel loathing to please, 
Barraged all of us with a storm of disease. 

U e hacked with pneumonia, our breaths became foul. 
Herpetic eruptions disfigured each face. 
Serpentine tapeworms traversed every bowel 
And we grew granulomas all over the place. 
Our skin was infected with fungus and fleas 
And psoriasis crusted our elbows and knees. 

And the great white citadel nursed us each day, 
As our cancerous bodies collapsed in decay. 

We tasted the pharmacological stream. 
But it swept us away in a chemical flood 
\^ hich floated us on in a heroin dream 
While Chloromycetin disfigured our blood. 
And we lived now each day in a tremulous fear 
Of nausea, vomiting . . . diarrhea. 



And the great white citadel, proud of our bloom 
Threw us naked into an examining room. 

We rushed to each other with stupified awe, 

Astonished by acres of glistening skin, 

We pounded upon each thoracic door 

And listened to murmurings creep from within 

And then, in our nakedness struck out to find 

Deep in the citadel, more of our kind. 

And the great white citadel let us explore. 
And put us to work in its microscope corps. 

We were hardier now, and we shouldered the task. 

Arm linked to arm in our laboring camp. 

Though our eyes (still unformed) were not made to bask 

In the merciless light of a microscope lamp. 

But we counted the white cells and stared at the blood, 

Till our minds had submerged in a polka-dot flood. 

And the great white citadel announced it would seek 
To warmly endeavor to teach us to speak. 

So once every week, and one by one, 

We struggled to hit upon something to say, 

And the speech teacher rarely would praise what we'd done. 

But woe to the man who stuttered that day. 

And though this would give us a week's worth of fright, 

Every day yet another would teach us to write. 

And the great white citadel, bristling with pride, 
Decided to scatter us far and wide. 

We wandered determined mile after mile; 

Though limited by our umbilical cord, 

We voyaged to fabulous Goldwater Isle 

And the jungles of Bellevue Emergency Ward. 

But far as we wandered and faint though our track 

The great white citadel drew us all back. 

And the great white citadel glistening and bright 
Taught us to write, and to write, and to write. 



And then the day came when the great shining womb, 
Felt painful contractions and wriggled about. 
Was confined for two weeks in a great labor room, 
Where it slowly prepared to push each of us out. 
And then, like a pod, it exploded with birth 
To disseminate us to the ends of the earth. 

And now the great uterus, sullen and mute, 
Must sink to the pavement to involute. 



Martin P. Geller 



103 



Staff 

Robert M. Burd Editor 

Daniel D. Morgan, Jr Business Manager 

Michael G. Ehrlich Advertising Manager 

Peter F. Muehlbauer Captions Editor 

John Noble, III Associate Editor 

Richard Perlman Photography Editor 

Alan Schechter Contributing Editor 

Captions Committee: Peter Muehlbauer, Mark Kahn, Joel Rein, 
John Simmonds 

Contributors: Martin Geller, Albert Assali 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: Harry Gilbert of Roger Studios, Elizabeth Wilcox, Edwin Barton, S. C. Wang, H. G. Roebuck 
and Son. 





Above: STAFF AT WORK: Rein, Morgan, Ehrlich, Burd, 
Perlman, Kahn, Noble, Schechter. Above right: WE'RE 
BROKE: Burd and Morgan. Right: WHAT DO YOU MEAN, 
YOU WON'T PAY FOR THAT AD: Ehrlich in the world of 
business. 




104 





3*£ 



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